A Look Back at Hardcase #13 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

As you know by now, I really love following the stories of the Hardcase series of the Ultraverse published by Malibu Comics. Issue #12 had a very intriguing conclusion which gave the first fully year of the series a worthy ending (one that will compel readers to go back to issue #1 and search the origin story of Hardcase and The Squad) while setting up the anticipation for the next story in a compelling way.

As such, here is my look back at Hardcase #13 published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by the late James Hudnall and drawn by Kelly Krantz.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Hardcase and Choice agonizing over the shocking revelation from Lela Cho /Tech (The Solution) who helped them access crucial information they worked so hard searching. What they do not know is that they are constantly spied on by sinister figures.

“I knew it! I knew it! Those scum-sucking weasels! I’ll kill them,” said Hardcase in reaction to the shocking information. Lela Cho tries to calm him down as Choice agonizes on her knees.

As their emotions eased, Lela prepares her computer for their research of the highly detailed files that Aladdin has about them…

Quality

13
The story of Choice…

To make things clear, this comic book’s narrative is dominated by information-heavy references presented like computer files with accompanying images. There is actual little present-day story regarding Hardcase and Choice but that’s not a problem as the heavy exposition of background stories relating to Choice, Aladdin, Hardcase and others are very well written by Hudnall. By the time I finished the story, I got enlightened and also excited for the next story of Hardcase.

What I love about the heavy exposition was how it efficiently explained the details and completely avoided getting boring. The exposition also emphasized the specific roles Aladdin, the Choice Corporation, Ultratech and NuWare had in the Ultraverse and how they impacted the lives of people. This is comic book universe building crafted excellently by Hudnall.

Conclusion

10
More from the past of Choice.

The best way to describe Hardcase #13 is that it is an exposition-heavy, characterization-focused story that succeeded in its goal of enlightening the reader. James Hudnall’s writing is excellent which, by this time, is not surprising to me. As such, this comic book is worth reading more than once and like issue #12, it will compel you to go back to issue #1 and look deeper at the background of Hardcase and his time with The Squad.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #13 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #13 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #12 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

At long last, the twelfth issue of the Hardcase monthly series (note: the series lasted a total of 26 issues) of the Ultraverse is finally here. Since the opening page of issue #1, Hardcase has been very engaging, enjoyable and intriguing to read complete with very deep character development as written by the late James Hudnall. In comparison with superhero comics in general, Hardcase itself is pretty unique (a superhero team member who ends up the only walking survivor who gets into Hollywood before returning to doing superhero acts) even by today’s standards.

As the series went on, Hardcase got involved with Choice initially solving mysteries and finding answers. It was only recently they got involved romantically, which hurt Hardcase’s other girl Linda (the other survivor from The Squad). Along the way, Hardcase and Choice got involved with The Strangers and The Solution in memorable crossovers.

Now the stage is set! We will find out if the first full year of the Hardcase series will be completed with impact or not with this look back at Hardcase #12, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in the night in the desolate land, just a few miles away from the secret base of Aladdin. Hardcase and Choice were together resting when suddenly Headknocker and Hardwire arrive to attack them. As Hardcase and Headknocker start their rematch (note: they first fought in issue #1), Hardwire goes after Choice.

Even though he knows Hardknocker is tough, the Hollywood superhero makes his move to take on Hardwire and help Choice.

Meanwhile over at Groom Lake Control Center, two men in suits look at the images and details of Hardknocker and Hardwire on oversized screens. As they analyze the situation happening outside their facility, they argue over the possible release and use of the other undesirable ultras they captured…

Quality

10
Choice and Hardwire meet again.

There is no doubt that this is a very high-quality comic book with a very strong script that mixes spectacle with character development, secret society intrigue, mystery and some drama. The storytelling itself was successful thanks to Hudnall.

The story started strongly with action scenes with some build-up of suspense and mystery emphasized when the narrative switches to another scene at a different location. While there is a notable twist in the comic book, it is the ending that really shook things up so much, it made me go back to issue #1 and other references to The Squad. This is great writing done by James Hudnall and he knew how to shake the foundation of the series.

When it comes to the art, Scott Benefiel work here is great and the best one yet within the first year of the series. I love the way he draws facial expressions that really show emotions or intensity and he knows how the pace the flow of events (and still manage to draw dynamic action shots).

Conclusion

4
Headknocker and Hardcase.

Hardcase #12 is a great read and it certainly is not the typical good-versus-evil type of superhero story. As the conclusion of the first year of the Hardcase series of the 1990s, this one really defined the title character’s place in the Ultraverse as Hudnall shook the foundation of the series in a very memorable way. The ending of the comic book is truly powerful and it should be seen. It is easily one of the most notable endings of any Ultraverse comic book.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #12 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #12 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #11 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

After reviewing the first ten issues of the Hardcase monthly series, I should say that the title character is one of the most defining lead characters of not only the Ultraverse but also 1990s superhero comics in general. The late James Hudnall really defined the character Tom Hawke/Hardcase and established his rightful spot in the Ultraverse.

Now is time to take a look back at Hardcase #11 published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Hardcase and Choice riding a car in high speed going to Nevada to uncover a mystery. Their destination is Aladdin base, a top secret facility that the two believe contains the answers to Choice’s past.

Suddenly Hardcase slammed the brakes of the car as they encounter a helicopter in front of them. Worse than that, four powerful adversaries – Foxfire, Head Knocker, War Eagle and Hardwire – jointly confront them ready to fight to the death…

Quality

18
Really dynamic art by Scott Benefiel.

As before, James Hudnall delivered yet another compelling story and artist Scott Benefiel nailed it visually. To begin with, this comic book is packed with a lot of action and the blows and hard hits can be felt. As it is loaded with action, the narrative never felt brainless nor dumb. Rather, there was nice variety mixed with the spectacle as Hudnall made solid efforts to make each bad guy express himself respectively when fighting with Choice or Hardcase. Take for example, Hardwire is creepy and ruthless. Along the way, the coordination between Hardcase and Choice as well as between the bad guys themselves was well executed literally and visually.

As the conflicts went on, Aladdin’s presence was also felt even though there were no images used. In fact, the sudden involvement of the bad guys reflected what Aladdin does whenever it captures and uses individuals with special abilities or talents for its own gain.

More on Hardcase and Choice, I like the fact that the creators explained that Choice’s powers could only last 60 minutes and will take two hours to recharge. This adds weight to their mission of finding and infiltrating Aladdin’s base. How Choice and Hardcase deal with the challenge is worth reading.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Hardcase #11 is not only a really great comic book to read, it is also a clear attempt by the creators to build up something and conclude the first year of the monthly series with something strong. If course, this issue marked the 2nd part of The Angry Past storyline. We will find that out soon enough what will turn out next in Hardcase #12.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #11 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Hardcase #11 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #10 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Having read the first several issues of Hardcase, I must say that the late James Hudnall did an incredible job on developing the titular character. Hardcase #9 was very memorable as it marked a turning point in Hardcase’s life and the further development of his relationship with Choice, the lady he has been helping for some time. That particular comic book had a powerful ending as well.

That being said, now we can take a look back at Hardcase #10, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Kelly Krantz.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Tom Hawke/Hardcase being spied on electronically by Aladdin. It turns out, the secret organization has been spying on him for eight weeks as they viewed him as a potential danger to them given his ultra abilities, his capability of solving mysteries and recent interactions he had with other existing ultras. Aladdin continues to collect more data needed to launch a pre-emptive strike against Hardcase.

Meanwhile, Hardcase and Choice start a heartful talk about some serious, personal matters now that they are in a relationship. Choice admits that her memories of the past have been coming back since they returned from the moon.

Quality

13
Choice and Hardcase in a dramatic scene.

I’ll say it straight here – this comic book is full of character development laced with mystery and intrigue. It clearly lacks superhero action (which issue #9 had so much of) but that is NOT a problem at all. This is because James Hudnall’s script is truly compelling to read and his writing was successfully brought to life visually by Kelly Krantz. Not even the slowest scenes felt boring.

What I enjoyed a lot here, apart from character development, are the flashbacks presented as Choice recalled the past. They were very well written and moved at a nice pace. The more the past of Choice was revealed, the more I wanted to discover. The same goes with how the past fit smoothly with Hardcase’s search for answers. It’s really great writing done by Hudnall.

Conclusion

2
Really nice visual presentation of how Aladdin spies on Hardcase. This was long before Wikileaks and the modern age of electronic surveillance.

No doubt about it. Hardcase #10 is a great read! It has almost no superhero spectacle but the story, characterization, suspense and intrigue all more than made up for it. Other than exploring the deepening relationship between the Hollywood ultra and Choice, this comic book is one of the most defining stories about the secret organization Aladdin and what it has been doing behind the scenes. How Aladdin is portrayed, you really have to read the comic book and I assure you all, it is worth discovering on your own!

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #10 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #10 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #9 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Having reviewed the first eight issues of the Hardcase series, I should say that the title character is easily one of the best protagonists of the entire Ultraverse and the late author James Hudnall deserves credit for the storytelling and character development. Hardcase made it in CBR’s 2016 article about what is being missed from the Ultraverse.

As written in the said CBR.com article: Created by James Hudnall, Hardcase was one of the first superheroes in the Ultraverse, forming a team with some other early superheroes. They called themselves “The Squad,” and soon became extremely famous. However, tragedy struck when the team took on a powerful villain, who killed almost all of them, with only Hardcase remaining as The Squad’s only surviving member. Of his three other teammates, two died and one was comatose. He retired from being a superhero and instead became an actor, portraying himself in major motion pictures. When the Ultraverse officially began, Hardcase was pulled out of retirement to become a superhero once again.

Before he passed away on April 2019, Hudnall expressed his support for US President Donald Trump and pointed out that the media has been lying and the ones who are fascists are the rioters who attacked people since the 2016 election.

With all that information presented, let’s take a look back at Hardcase #9, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Hudnall and drawn by Brent Anderson (the same guy behind the 1982 graphic novel X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills).

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Tom Hawke/Hardcase spending time with the comatose Linda. He tells her about what he went through recently. The narrative shifts to a few days back with his work in filmmaking. He meets with Choice whom he has gotten close with for some time.

Inside a trailer, the two discuss relationships and the complexity that comes with acting with regards to emotions.

A short time later, a huge monster attacks Hardcase in public. The monster tells him: “You’re as egotistical as all the rest. It’ll be a pleasure to send you to your grave.”

Quality

9
This is one of many scenes of action brilliantly drawn by Brent Anderson.

As the adventures with the Strangers and the Solution are over, this particular comic book served its purpose well – the further development of the relationship between Hardcase and Choice. The way Hudnall scripted this comic book showed a nice balance between romance, superhero spectacle (note: this comic book is loaded!) and the key element of maturity (with regards to dealing with love from both the past and the present).

With regards to the art, Brent Anderson’s debut with the Hardcase series is pretty solid. I like the gritty touch of the visuals he used on the characters, most notably Hardcase and Choice.

Conclusion

5
Hardcase and Choice in Hollywood.

No doubt that this is another solid Hardcase story. I enjoyed this from start to finish (which was emotionally powerful and symbolic). Hardcase #9 marks a new turn in the life of the the title hero.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #9 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $7.

If you are looking for original Hardcase #9 art by Brent Anderson, click here.

Overall, Hardcase #9 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #8 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! It’s time for another story about Hardcase, who is one of the more interesting characters of the Ultraverse as far as I am concerned. With seven issues already reviewed, I can say that the development of Hardcase really worked well thanks to the combined efforts of the creative team with James Hudnall as lead writer. The previous issue I reviewed was part of the Break-Thru crossover of the Ultraverse.

Now we can start looking back at Hardcase #8, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins a short time after the end of the Break-Thru crossover, set on the surface of the moon. A team hired by Rex Mundi tries to reach a spaceship (provided by Mundi) only to see it fly off without them.

Inside the ship, Hardcase, Choice and The Solution celebrate not only because they are going home but also because they beat their Mundi-hired rivals (who destroyed the ship of Hardcase and companions).

Back on the moon, the ones who got left behind reached out to Rex Mundi who is actually inside the Los Angeles headquarters of the Choice Corporation. He starts plotting to get Choice back…

Quality

7
Hardcase, Choice and The Solution in space.

As a story, Hardcase #8 pretty much serves like a wind-up of the events of the Break-Thru crossover but managed to follow Hardcase and Choice enough to keep fans of this comic book series engaged. While there is very little room for character development, at least this comic book emphasized Hardcase’s interactions with The Solution which was believable to follow. When it comes to further magnifying the core elements of the Ultraverse, I like the way James Hudnall emphasized the potential rivalry of power between Rex Mundi (the king) and Regina.

As for the visuals, artist Scott Benefiel’s work here was good and I liked how he illustrated The Solution and the rest of the supporting characters. There were a few shots in which his art resembled that of George Perez.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Hardcase #8 is an entertaining read even though the title character had to share the spotlight with other characters of the Ultraverse, which is understandable since this is a post-Break-Thru tale. What it lacks in character development, it bounced back nicely with build-up and suspense.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #8 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #8 (1994) is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

 

 

A Look Back at Hardcase #7

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey Ultraverse fans! Are you ready for another bout of new discoveries in the Ultraverse through Hardcase, the superhero of Hollywood trying to do good.

Let’s all take a look back at Hardcase #7, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel. The comic book was part of the Break-Thru crossover.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins on a city street when two guys tried to force two people out of the car they were riding. Suddenly Hardcase and Choice arrive surprising them and making short work out of the bad guys. The two victims who got saved could only be impressed by Hardcase and Choice as they watch them fly away.

At his office, Hardcase formally introduces Choice to his secretary Celia Brady, his agent Sol Gernstein and his lawyer John Riley. Together they meet to discuss how to free Choice from the clutches of the Choice Corporation.

Elsewhere, a mechanized menace slowly makes its move and kills a racoon in cold blood. It pulls the dead animal to itself and assimilates with it…

Quality

5
Choice meets Hardcase’s trusted people.

Hardcase #7 is another compelling story about Hardcase’s search for answers and the connection with the Break-Thru crossover is a factor that works nicely. With in-depth writing by James Hudnall, this comic book not only expands the realm of the Ultraverse but also links nicely with the events of The Strangers #1 and Hardcase’s past. As the story builds up for Break-Thru, it also introduces readers to a key sinister figure of the Ultraverse. Lastly, I should say that James Hudnall pulled off a lot intriguing moments and how the story ended surprised me pleasantly.

When it comes to the art quality, Scott Benefiel’s work is solid. I also like his visual take on a certain superhero team that suddenly appeared in this comic book. Which team is that? You’ll have to find out.

Conclusion

3
Superhero action nicely drawn.

This is yet another very engaging story of Hardcase. Thanks to the works of the creative team, Hardcase #7 literally did not pull back its punches when it comes to surprising me as I followed Hardcase on his efforts to solve mysteries. This is definitely not your typical superhero-saves-the-day story.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #7, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #7 is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at The Strangers #7 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

In a previous review, Prototype #5 served mainly as a build-up leading to the crossover between the armored superhero and The Strangers. While that comic book had a cover that looked suggestive, Prototype and the group did not appear together until the final page.

The payoff for the crossover happens to be in The Strangers #7.

Will the crossover be worth it? Find in this look back at The Strangers #7, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Steve Englehart (shared plot credit with Tom Mason and Len Strazewski) and drawn by Rick Hoberg. This comic book is part of the Break-Thru crossover.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

Picking up where Prototype #5 ended, the story begins inside the space station wherein The Strangers encounter large, ugly monsters just as Prototype and his two companions – Empire 7 from Vietnam and Supra from the Baltic States – arrive. Equipped with high technology, Prototype proceeds to help the Strangers surprising them as a result.

After some struggle, Prototype, the Strangers plus Empire 7 and Supra start talking about what has been going on. As far as the Strangers are concerned, they need to know why they got their powers which explains why the needed J.D. Hunt’s rocket to reach space. Supra explains that she, Empire 7 and Prototype were sent to reclaim Hunt’s rocket.

After Prototype insists on reclaiming the rocket, Grenade strikes him which leads to Yrial to using her magic on him. The armored hero reacts by bodily attacking Yrial and damaging the wall behind her leading to outer space…

Quality

22
A nice scene between Prototype and two of the Strangers.

As this comic book was wonderfully written, I do confirm that the payoff for the build-up leading to the crossover between Prototype and The Strangers was undeniably worth it! There is a lot of richness in the script and I really enjoyed the interactions between the Strangers and the armored ultra.

I should state that the plot was structured to have the heroes together for initial interaction, have a few of them separated temporarily, bring them back together for unity and separate them into small groups as they search for answers.

In between, there is a lot of character interaction and development. These are the elements that defined this comic book and by the time I reached the end, I managed to grasp how the connection (as well as the level of trust) between Prototype and the Strangers turned out. Along the way, there were a few sub-plots and even some exposition on the in-universe history of ultras (emphasized by Empire 7). There were also some action scenes to balance things out with the characterization.

With no surprise, the art by Rick Hoberg here is great. I should state that his art on Prototype made the character look recognizable. More importantly, Hoberg drew the characters, the monsters and the environments with a good amount of detail. This is hard work that nicely paid off!

Conclusion

2
The first interaction between Prototype and the Strangers.

I really enjoyed The Strangers #7 and it definitely paid off nicely after the build-up to the crossover established in Prototype #5. If I were to make comparisons, the crossover here is just as good as the Hardcase-Strangers crossover. I should also state there is a good amount of fun here.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of The Strangers #7 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition is priced at $8.

Overall, The Strangers #7 (1993) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #6

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Previously, I admired Hardcase #5 for its nice mix of suspense, intrigue and mystery as the series emphasized its lead character who in turn had to accompany Choice (who herself was under the control of a certain corporation).

Will the high engagement continue? Find out as we take a look back at the Ultraverse comic book Hardcase #6, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins immediately after the end of issue #5 with Tom Hawke/Hardcase down on the ground. As Choice comes to him, Hardwire (the guy who attacked Hardcase) moves in from behind. As he is about strike her, Hardcase’s soul warns Choice to activate her shield. Hardwire strikes her but got hurt as a result of the protective shield. Even as Hardwire tells her he has not orders to kill her, Choice fires her force beams to hit a structure just behind him then grabs Hardcase to fly away to safety.

As they fly away towards the nearest hospital, Hardcase finds himself in the spiritual realm and encounters Linda.

Meanwhile, Hardwire contacts Sandra Trent by phone. Considering the current situation, Sandra tells him that they will have to get Hardcase later and she has another hit job for him…

Quality

7
Sandra Trent and Hardwire.

With regards to storytelling, this comic book is loaded with twists mixed with some intrigue and action. The dialogue is also well crafted. Speaking of intrigue, there are key details and characters revealed here that serve as a solid build-up for the Break-Thru crossover of the Ultraverse of late-1993. If there is anything lacking here, it’s character development which is understandable since there was emphasis on building up not only Break-Thru but also other mysterious aspects of the Ultraverse as a whole.

Scott Benefiel did a fine job with the art. I really like the way he draws facial expressions (especially on Hardcase and Choice) while maintaining pace with the script and making the few action scenes here look pretty dynamic.

Conclusion

2
Hardwire, Choice and Hardcase.

Hardcase #6 is another solid comic book to read. What it lacks in character development, it bounced back a lot with build-up, mystery and intrigue. That being said, before reading the Break-Thru crossover comic books, it is important to read this comic book first.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #6, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $7.

Overall, Hardcase #6 is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

 

 

A Look Back at Hardcase #5

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

I should say that Hardcase is truly a unique title and it also is one of the more defining titles of the Ultraverse. It features a super human being who has powers but remains constantly disturbed with guilt having survived a tragedy that killed two teammates and incapacitated his loved one. On moving forward, he worked in Hollywood movie productions until evil forces compelled him to get involved.

Previously I reviewed Hardcase’s crossover with the Strangers told in two comic books. Now we can focus more on him and his pretty companion choice in a standalone adventure in Hardcase #5, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover1
The cover.

Early story

The story begins at a nice home in Dana Point, California, where a man named Jonny Wong is making love with a lady only to be disrupted by a telephone call. Upon answering the phone, Jonny is informed to get out as a killer has been sent to kill him. He does not realize that his bodyguards have been killed. Suddenly a man enters the bedroom and kills him and the lady.

A short time later, Hardcase and Choice arrive to meet with detective Chuck Brown who examines the photograph of the dead Jonny Wong and the woman. With the detective’s assistance, Hardcase and Choice proceed to meet Bob Dixon, the head of the Choice Corporation at its headquarters…

Quality

14
Meet Sandra Trent and Rex Mundi.

This is another well written story by James Hudnall. I like the way the mystery got established followed by Hardcase’s search for answers. This story, which was nicely illustrated by Scott Benefiel, further explored the Choice Corporation and its control on Choice. Hardcase was shown to really care for Choice which I enjoyed as part of witnessing how his personality developed. Furthermore, this story nicely reconnects to something particular from Hardcase’s last day with The Squad and it sure was presented with a strong horror flavor. As the corporate world in California is further explored, this comic book introduces Sandra Trent who is about to get involved with the dirty business of eliminating ultras.

Conclusion

6
Hardcase and Choice at the Choice Corporation HQ.

I really like Hardcase #5. Strong mystery element in the story mixed with intrigue and an unrelenting sense of suspense. When it comes to spectacle, this comic book does not have much but that is not a problem at all. This is still an enjoyable read.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #5, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition and the newsstand edition cost $4 and $8 respectively.

Overall, Hardcase #5 is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com