A Look Back at Hardcase #13 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

As you know by now, I really love following the stories of the Hardcase series of the Ultraverse published by Malibu Comics. Issue #12 had a very intriguing conclusion which gave the first fully year of the series a worthy ending (one that will compel readers to go back to issue #1 and search the origin story of Hardcase and The Squad) while setting up the anticipation for the next story in a compelling way.

As such, here is my look back at Hardcase #13 published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by the late James Hudnall and drawn by Kelly Krantz.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Hardcase and Choice agonizing over the shocking revelation from Lela Cho /Tech (The Solution) who helped them access crucial information they worked so hard searching. What they do not know is that they are constantly spied on by sinister figures.

“I knew it! I knew it! Those scum-sucking weasels! I’ll kill them,” said Hardcase in reaction to the shocking information. Lela Cho tries to calm him down as Choice agonizes on her knees.

As their emotions eased, Lela prepares her computer for their research of the highly detailed files that Aladdin has about them…

Quality

13
The story of Choice…

To make things clear, this comic book’s narrative is dominated by information-heavy references presented like computer files with accompanying images. There is actual little present-day story regarding Hardcase and Choice but that’s not a problem as the heavy exposition of background stories relating to Choice, Aladdin, Hardcase and others are very well written by Hudnall. By the time I finished the story, I got enlightened and also excited for the next story of Hardcase.

What I love about the heavy exposition was how it efficiently explained the details and completely avoided getting boring. The exposition also emphasized the specific roles Aladdin, the Choice Corporation, Ultratech and NuWare had in the Ultraverse and how they impacted the lives of people. This is comic book universe building crafted excellently by Hudnall.

Conclusion

10
More from the past of Choice.

The best way to describe Hardcase #13 is that it is an exposition-heavy, characterization-focused story that succeeded in its goal of enlightening the reader. James Hudnall’s writing is excellent which, by this time, is not surprising to me. As such, this comic book is worth reading more than once and like issue #12, it will compel you to go back to issue #1 and look deeper at the background of Hardcase and his time with The Squad.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #13 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #13 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prime #5 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! If you are looking for something new with my retro reviews of Ultraverse comic books, then you will get it now as I’ve decided to go back to the Prime monthly series for the first time in over thirty days since my last Prime review.

That being said, here is my look back at Prime #5, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and Gerard Jones, and drawn by the late Norm Breyfogle.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with an unbelievable yet living cartoon character called Maxi-Man about to strike a young and helpless Kevin (Prime actually) claiming to be doing it for the majesty of Boneyard (a villain of Mantra’s). Fortunately, Kevin got saved by Kelly who pulled him away from Maxi-Man’s deadly strike.

With the local community already in chaos due to Maxi-Man’s rampage, Kevin and Kelly ran to the nearby city park only to be stopped by the him. With her ankle hurt, Kelly could not move from her downed position and tells Kevin to run.

Kevin struggles with the tension building up as Maxi-Man makes his way to Kelly…

Quality

Heavily action-packed, smart, intriguing and engaging this comic book truly is! Let me start with the storytelling here. Len Strazewski and Gerard Jones crafted a great story that not only followed Prime’s exploits but also fleshed out his personality a lot with an emphasis on his civilian life as teenager Kevin who happens to be dealing with the pressure of living a double-life (as an unstable superhero and as a high school student). He pursues to be with Kelly but suddenly finds themselves in trouble with the unexpected presence of Maxi-Man, an in-story cartoon character Kevin admired so much as a child. This not only added to Kevin’s struggle with stress but also complicates his mind. By focusing closely on Kevin, you will feel his struggle a lot.

When it comes to the spectacle, Norm Breyfogle perfectly brought the script to life and ramped up the excitement a whole lot with his illustrations. The visual highlight is the big battle between Prime and Maxi-Man, and even though the fighting is extensive, it never feels dumb nor brainless due to the smart dialogue provided by the writers (note: observe closely the exchange of words Prime and Maxi-Man had with each other). Breyfogle clearly paced the action sequences smoothly and he chose the right moments to draw the action dynamically.

Speaking of dialogue, I love the following line Prime said during the fight with Maxi-Man…

“I’m what you’re supposed to be! I’m a hero! I grew up on your cartoons! I learned about heroism from you! About fighting for what’s right! I don’t know how you got to be real, or why you’re trying to kill us—but I’m gonna show you what you taught me!”

Back to the writing, there is a sub-plot that took place during the big battle. That one added a good amount of mystery and intrigue not only into the story but also to the Ultraverse itself.

Conclusion

2
Kevin (Prime), Kelly and Maxi-Man.

What can I say? Prime #5 is a great read! Personally, when it comes to Prime’s encounters, I found this one to be much more engaging, more fun and more intriguing than even Prime’s encounter with Prototype in the previous issue (which is supposed to be an essential encounter between the Ultraverse’s main superheroes). The way I look at this comic book’s quality, the creators actually over-did themselves to deliver superhero greatness.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prime #5 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $8.

Overall, Prime #5 (1993) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #12 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

At long last, the twelfth issue of the Hardcase monthly series (note: the series lasted a total of 26 issues) of the Ultraverse is finally here. Since the opening page of issue #1, Hardcase has been very engaging, enjoyable and intriguing to read complete with very deep character development as written by the late James Hudnall. In comparison with superhero comics in general, Hardcase itself is pretty unique (a superhero team member who ends up the only walking survivor who gets into Hollywood before returning to doing superhero acts) even by today’s standards.

As the series went on, Hardcase got involved with Choice initially solving mysteries and finding answers. It was only recently they got involved romantically, which hurt Hardcase’s other girl Linda (the other survivor from The Squad). Along the way, Hardcase and Choice got involved with The Strangers and The Solution in memorable crossovers.

Now the stage is set! We will find out if the first full year of the Hardcase series will be completed with impact or not with this look back at Hardcase #12, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in the night in the desolate land, just a few miles away from the secret base of Aladdin. Hardcase and Choice were together resting when suddenly Headknocker and Hardwire arrive to attack them. As Hardcase and Headknocker start their rematch (note: they first fought in issue #1), Hardwire goes after Choice.

Even though he knows Hardknocker is tough, the Hollywood superhero makes his move to take on Hardwire and help Choice.

Meanwhile over at Groom Lake Control Center, two men in suits look at the images and details of Hardknocker and Hardwire on oversized screens. As they analyze the situation happening outside their facility, they argue over the possible release and use of the other undesirable ultras they captured…

Quality

10
Choice and Hardwire meet again.

There is no doubt that this is a very high-quality comic book with a very strong script that mixes spectacle with character development, secret society intrigue, mystery and some drama. The storytelling itself was successful thanks to Hudnall.

The story started strongly with action scenes with some build-up of suspense and mystery emphasized when the narrative switches to another scene at a different location. While there is a notable twist in the comic book, it is the ending that really shook things up so much, it made me go back to issue #1 and other references to The Squad. This is great writing done by James Hudnall and he knew how to shake the foundation of the series.

When it comes to the art, Scott Benefiel work here is great and the best one yet within the first year of the series. I love the way he draws facial expressions that really show emotions or intensity and he knows how the pace the flow of events (and still manage to draw dynamic action shots).

Conclusion

4
Headknocker and Hardcase.

Hardcase #12 is a great read and it certainly is not the typical good-versus-evil type of superhero story. As the conclusion of the first year of the Hardcase series of the 1990s, this one really defined the title character’s place in the Ultraverse as Hudnall shook the foundation of the series in a very memorable way. The ending of the comic book is truly powerful and it should be seen. It is easily one of the most notable endings of any Ultraverse comic book.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #12 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #12 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #4 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

One of the things that I like most about the Prototype monthly series of the Ultraverse is that it follows the respective exploits of not one but two men who got involved as pilots of Ultratech’s powered suits of armors. Bob Campbell is the older Prototype pilot from the past who got succeeded by Jimmy Ruiz, a much younger guy doing the corporation’s wishes.

So far, the dual-narrative approach to storytelling worked well for me and it is one of the more defining elements of the Prototype series. We can find out more with this look back at Prototype #4, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski and drawn by David Ammerman.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in New York City where Jimmy Ruiz looks down at the streets from the balcony of a tower. He remembered the old days when he used to live down there and spend time with his amigos. A pretty lady is on his bed with the blanket covering her naked body. After some talk, they make love with each other.

Over at the headquarters of Ultratech, a lady searches for Jimmy claiming she knows he’s living right there. The security guard tells her that Jimmy is not listed in the residential directory, and asked her to call the company in the morning. She leaves and passes by a man with a coat.

The coated guy approaches the security guard and asked for the name and contact number of their building manager. He claims to be look to sublet some office space….

Quality

15
Solidly fun action!

This is another well-written story by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski. In here, the new antagonist named Wrath was introduced and he certainly is not another generic bad guy opposite the superhero. During the heat of battle between him and Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz), you will learn nice details about Wrath through the banter. For one thing, Wrath works for a superior (like Prototype) and even though it is normal for him to use violence as a means of survival or winning, he makes it a point not to hurt civilians. The same conflict also paved the way for further development of the personality of Jimmy who is not only struggling with his job as Prototype pilot but also living with things that his employer physically implanted into his body that’s supposed to link him with the armor.

On the other hand, there is a short segment following former Prototype pilot Bob Campbell which served as a strong ending for the comic book. You really have to read it.

Conclusion

11
And the battle begins…

I really like this comic book. It’s got all the fun and compelling stuff any reader can enjoy. The introduction of Wrath alone is worth the cover price.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #4 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #4 (1993) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #11 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

After reviewing the first ten issues of the Hardcase monthly series, I should say that the title character is one of the most defining lead characters of not only the Ultraverse but also 1990s superhero comics in general. The late James Hudnall really defined the character Tom Hawke/Hardcase and established his rightful spot in the Ultraverse.

Now is time to take a look back at Hardcase #11 published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Hardcase and Choice riding a car in high speed going to Nevada to uncover a mystery. Their destination is Aladdin base, a top secret facility that the two believe contains the answers to Choice’s past.

Suddenly Hardcase slammed the brakes of the car as they encounter a helicopter in front of them. Worse than that, four powerful adversaries – Foxfire, Head Knocker, War Eagle and Hardwire – jointly confront them ready to fight to the death…

Quality

18
Really dynamic art by Scott Benefiel.

As before, James Hudnall delivered yet another compelling story and artist Scott Benefiel nailed it visually. To begin with, this comic book is packed with a lot of action and the blows and hard hits can be felt. As it is loaded with action, the narrative never felt brainless nor dumb. Rather, there was nice variety mixed with the spectacle as Hudnall made solid efforts to make each bad guy express himself respectively when fighting with Choice or Hardcase. Take for example, Hardwire is creepy and ruthless. Along the way, the coordination between Hardcase and Choice as well as between the bad guys themselves was well executed literally and visually.

As the conflicts went on, Aladdin’s presence was also felt even though there were no images used. In fact, the sudden involvement of the bad guys reflected what Aladdin does whenever it captures and uses individuals with special abilities or talents for its own gain.

More on Hardcase and Choice, I like the fact that the creators explained that Choice’s powers could only last 60 minutes and will take two hours to recharge. This adds weight to their mission of finding and infiltrating Aladdin’s base. How Choice and Hardcase deal with the challenge is worth reading.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Hardcase #11 is not only a really great comic book to read, it is also a clear attempt by the creators to build up something and conclude the first year of the monthly series with something strong. If course, this issue marked the 2nd part of The Angry Past storyline. We will find that out soon enough what will turn out next in Hardcase #12.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #11 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Hardcase #11 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Solitaire #7 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Are you readers craving for another tale of crime-fighting and vigilantes set within the Ultraverse? Get ready for another bout of conflicts told through the eyes of Solitaire, one of the more unique crime-fighting superheroes to have ever existed.

As such, here is a look back at Solitaire #7, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Gerard Jones and drawn by Jeff Johnson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with the arrival of Double Edge, a caped swordsman who strong believes that all things in life must be balanced no matter how hard it could be. As far as he is concerned, only he can help achieve balance whenever the scales are tilted. Double Edge jumps down on a man (outside of a parked car), knocked him out and grabbed the keys from him. Another man comes out of the café and spots Double Edge with the keys, which made him think the swordsman was stealing the downed man’s car. Double Edge strikes him impulsively to balance things out but ends up leaving him down on the sidewalk with a lot of blood lost. The swordsman regrets it.

Double Edge drives the car still obsessing with balancing. Suddenly another car – driven by Solitaire – gets into his way forcing the swordsman to move his car leftwards and hit another vehicle.

Immediately, Solitaire and Double Edge jumped out of their vehicles to start a fight…

Quality

17
Really nice action between Solitaire and Double Edge by Jeff Johnson.

For a pretty wordy comic book, this one still managed to entertain with lots of action and intriguing dialogue. As far as narrative is concerned, this one is about Solitaire dealing with a fellow costumed vigilante who is obsessed with balance even thought it complicates his ways of fighting criminals.

What is easily the strongest selling point as well as the most interesting aspect of this comic book is the clash between Solitaire and Double Edge not only with armed combat but also with the very different ways they look at fighting crime and helping people in times of danger. Their exchange of words is engaging thanks to the strong dialogue.

As with the previous issues, Jeff Johnson delivered good visuals complete with a smooth flow of transition.

Conclusion

2
Double Edge jumps on someone.

Solitaire #7 is indeed entertaining and intriguing. It’s not an Ultraverse story with a high-stakes concept, but it succeeds in telling a more grounded story within the said universe through the eyes of not just one but two costumed crime fighters. This comic book was released with an “Ultraverse 1st Birthday” mark on the cover and considering what happened in the first six issues, this one really felt like a turning point in the saga of Solitaire.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Solitaire #7 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Solitaire #7 is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #7 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! Are you ready for another return to the Ultraverse following the tales of Prototype?

We can start now with this look back at Prototype #7, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski, and illustrated by Roger Robinson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins high above the city street with a battle between Prototype (piloted by Jimmy Ruiz using a more advanced armor provided by his boss) and Arena. The boss of Jimmy could only express surprise to see Arena return having believed that Bob Campbell finished him off some months back.

As the fight goes on, Arena realizes that it is not his old nemesis Bob Campbell occupying the Prototype armor. For his part, Jimmy struggles with the uncertainty that comes with fighting his predecessor’s nemesis from the past.

Meanwhile at the roof of Ultratech’s headquarters in the city, armed and armored personnel take position following the orders of Leland…

Quality

Once again, Tom Mason and Len Strazewski crafted another strongly engaging story with the established mix of spectacle, corporate intrigue and the continued development of the two pilots of Prototype – Jimmy and Bob.

Speaking of the two, I love the way the story explored the other key elements from the respective personal lives of Jimmy and Bob. While Bob tends to his friend Jake in the hospital, Jimmy’s girl continues to pursue him (Jimmy) even though he is occupied with working as Prototype. This comic book also went the extra mile confirming the shared universe connection with a certain other Ultraverse character (note: he had his own series) making an appearance.

Artist Roger Robinson continued to deliver nice visuals that reflected the script, from the subtle drama scenes to the dynamic action scenes.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #7 is another solidly enjoyable comic book of the Ultraverse, worthy of inclusion in your collection.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #7 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $13.

Overall, Prototype #7 is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #10 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Having read the first several issues of Hardcase, I must say that the late James Hudnall did an incredible job on developing the titular character. Hardcase #9 was very memorable as it marked a turning point in Hardcase’s life and the further development of his relationship with Choice, the lady he has been helping for some time. That particular comic book had a powerful ending as well.

That being said, now we can take a look back at Hardcase #10, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Kelly Krantz.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Tom Hawke/Hardcase being spied on electronically by Aladdin. It turns out, the secret organization has been spying on him for eight weeks as they viewed him as a potential danger to them given his ultra abilities, his capability of solving mysteries and recent interactions he had with other existing ultras. Aladdin continues to collect more data needed to launch a pre-emptive strike against Hardcase.

Meanwhile, Hardcase and Choice start a heartful talk about some serious, personal matters now that they are in a relationship. Choice admits that her memories of the past have been coming back since they returned from the moon.

Quality

13
Choice and Hardcase in a dramatic scene.

I’ll say it straight here – this comic book is full of character development laced with mystery and intrigue. It clearly lacks superhero action (which issue #9 had so much of) but that is NOT a problem at all. This is because James Hudnall’s script is truly compelling to read and his writing was successfully brought to life visually by Kelly Krantz. Not even the slowest scenes felt boring.

What I enjoyed a lot here, apart from character development, are the flashbacks presented as Choice recalled the past. They were very well written and moved at a nice pace. The more the past of Choice was revealed, the more I wanted to discover. The same goes with how the past fit smoothly with Hardcase’s search for answers. It’s really great writing done by Hudnall.

Conclusion

2
Really nice visual presentation of how Aladdin spies on Hardcase. This was long before Wikileaks and the modern age of electronic surveillance.

No doubt about it. Hardcase #10 is a great read! It has almost no superhero spectacle but the story, characterization, suspense and intrigue all more than made up for it. Other than exploring the deepening relationship between the Hollywood ultra and Choice, this comic book is one of the most defining stories about the secret organization Aladdin and what it has been doing behind the scenes. How Aladdin is portrayed, you really have to read the comic book and I assure you all, it is worth discovering on your own!

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #10 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #10 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #6 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Wrapping up the details after the end of a major crossover is undoubtedly challenging for any comic book creator. Doing such aftermath work includes settling the interaction between characters from different comic book series, explaining the details behind what happened, how the event itself affected the rest of the comic book universe and more. The crossover I’m referring to her specifically is Break-Thru, the memorable year-ender story of the Ultraverse.

This time, we will see the post-Break-Thru side through the armored hero of the Ultraverse in this look back at Prototype #6, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story co-written by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason, and drawn by Roger Robinson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins just hours after the ultras of Earth fought the epic battle on the moon. Prototype and Prime fly their way back to Earth, with the latter serving as a makeshift shield from the heat of re-entry. By this time, the two ultras just concluded their meeting with the Strangers back on the moon, and it was there the idea of trailing Prime was discussed. For Prototype, doing this was crazy especially since it was only days since he fought Prime back on Earth.

Along the way, Prototype (pilot by Jimmy Ruiz specifically) intends to talk with Stanley Leland whom he believes set him up and almost got him killed with the mission to the moon…

Quality

4
After Prototype and Prime parted ways with the Strangers…

This comic book’s story is compelling. Not only does it wrap up the details of Break-Thru through the viewpoint of Prototype, it excelled with telling the story of Bob Campbell (the original Prototype pilot). As the build-up for Bob has been established in the previous issues, his story here resulted a nice pay-off and most notably, it raises the stakes when it comes to the narrative of the Prototype series (which consistently told parallel stories of Jimmy and Bob). I also enjoyed the introduction of a new villainess as well as the continued portrayal of corporate intrigue (this alone is one of the best features of the Ultraverse narrative).

The visuals done by Roger Robinson are pretty good and they really brought the script to life. Robinson also scored well with making the action scenes look dynamic without going over the top.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #6 is a great read! Not only does it wrap up the Break-Thru crossover through Prototype, it also has solid storytelling turning points not only with Bob Campbell but also Jimmy Ruiz. There were no boring scenes and I love the way the script emphasized the culture of corporate America within the Ultraverse and how it affects ultras.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #6 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #6 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #9 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Having reviewed the first eight issues of the Hardcase series, I should say that the title character is easily one of the best protagonists of the entire Ultraverse and the late author James Hudnall deserves credit for the storytelling and character development. Hardcase made it in CBR’s 2016 article about what is being missed from the Ultraverse.

As written in the said CBR.com article: Created by James Hudnall, Hardcase was one of the first superheroes in the Ultraverse, forming a team with some other early superheroes. They called themselves “The Squad,” and soon became extremely famous. However, tragedy struck when the team took on a powerful villain, who killed almost all of them, with only Hardcase remaining as The Squad’s only surviving member. Of his three other teammates, two died and one was comatose. He retired from being a superhero and instead became an actor, portraying himself in major motion pictures. When the Ultraverse officially began, Hardcase was pulled out of retirement to become a superhero once again.

Before he passed away on April 2019, Hudnall expressed his support for US President Donald Trump and pointed out that the media has been lying and the ones who are fascists are the rioters who attacked people since the 2016 election.

With all that information presented, let’s take a look back at Hardcase #9, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Hudnall and drawn by Brent Anderson (the same guy behind the 1982 graphic novel X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills).

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Tom Hawke/Hardcase spending time with the comatose Linda. He tells her about what he went through recently. The narrative shifts to a few days back with his work in filmmaking. He meets with Choice whom he has gotten close with for some time.

Inside a trailer, the two discuss relationships and the complexity that comes with acting with regards to emotions.

A short time later, a huge monster attacks Hardcase in public. The monster tells him: “You’re as egotistical as all the rest. It’ll be a pleasure to send you to your grave.”

Quality

9
This is one of many scenes of action brilliantly drawn by Brent Anderson.

As the adventures with the Strangers and the Solution are over, this particular comic book served its purpose well – the further development of the relationship between Hardcase and Choice. The way Hudnall scripted this comic book showed a nice balance between romance, superhero spectacle (note: this comic book is loaded!) and the key element of maturity (with regards to dealing with love from both the past and the present).

With regards to the art, Brent Anderson’s debut with the Hardcase series is pretty solid. I like the gritty touch of the visuals he used on the characters, most notably Hardcase and Choice.

Conclusion

5
Hardcase and Choice in Hollywood.

No doubt that this is another solid Hardcase story. I enjoyed this from start to finish (which was emotionally powerful and symbolic). Hardcase #9 marks a new turn in the life of the the title hero.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #9 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $7.

If you are looking for original Hardcase #9 art by Brent Anderson, click here.

Overall, Hardcase #9 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com