A Look Back at Godzilla #1 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, comic book collectors, sci-fi enthusiasts and fellow geeks! You must have heard by now that pop culture icons Godzilla and King Kong will clash together on the big screen in Godzilla vs. Kong (2021). Check out the official trailer below.

Take note that this is NOT the first time the two giant monsters encountered each other on the big screen. In fact, there was a Japanese-produced movie that featured the two released in 1963 and it involved Ishirô Honda who himself directed the 1954 original Godzilla movie. As the decades passed by, Godzilla movies were viewed by lots of people around the world and by the time efforts were taken to realize a Hollywood-produced film showcasing Japan’s icon, its place in global pop culture was already sealed.

And here is the thing that should interest you all – before the 1998 Hollywood Godzilla film (directed by Roland Emmerich) was even released, Dark Horse Comics published a series of Godzilla comic books. Of course, this was not the first time Godzilla made its presence felt in illustrated literature but the mid-1990s series was an effort to modernize Japan’s icon with readers (and comic collectors) of the time.

With those details laid down, here is a look back at Godzilla #1, published by Dark Horse Comics in 1995 with a story written by Kevin Maguire and drawn by Brandon McKinney.  

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with a network television talk show focused on Godzilla and the possibility of it attacking North America. On the air, TV show host Kate Koshiro talks with research team G-Force member Take’ who states that Godzilla has been injected with poison and swam to the bottom of the ocean. Even so, they never found a corpse.

As the show goes on, it is revealed by Take’ that his team uses low-frequency signals which they hope will attract Godzilla and even pacify it. Take’ eventually begins to get nervous as Kate Koshiro presses him for details. Behind the scenes, personnel of G-Force watch the show on their giant monitor.

The G-Force personnel turn their attention away from the TV show as they have been alerted to the sudden emergence of Godzilla, 77 miles northwest of Vancouver…

Quality

The destructive power of Godzilla!

If you are looking for a good, original story of Godzilla to read, this comic book has it! To start with, it has a nice world concept of its own surrounding the monster. G-Force serves as the primary organization the world goes to not only for protection from Godzilla’s attacks but also extensive research-and-development (R&D) that can make breakthroughs the world can benefit from, and intelligence that the respective defense forces of nations can use.

The characters are an interesting mix with elements from G-Force and the American armed services doing most of the interaction, talking and exposition. The closest thing this comic book has to a human protagonist is Take’ who turned out to be more capable than being a researcher of G-Force.

As for Godzilla, there is nothing new with the monster’s portrayal even though it is confirmed to be sick with poison. Wherever Godzilla goes, a lot of destruction happens making it look like the antagonist to the reader. In other words, a typical Godzilla portrayal. Fortunately, the comic book creators succeeded in maintaining the giant’s presence strongly even though the narrative was primarily focused on the human characters.

Conclusion

Nothing like carrying the tremendous pressure that comes with the unexpected emergence of a gigantic monster.

Godzilla #1 (1995) is surprisingly entertaining to read. When I first read this comic book, I had modest expectations and just let myself discover what it has to offer. The good news here is that the comic creators crafted a story that is interesting and fun enough to read. Apart from focusing on Godzilla, the G-Force organization has an interesting cast of characters.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Godzilla #1 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $70.

Overall, Godzilla #1 (1995) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Like any geek, I still love watching Terminator 2: Judgment Day, specifically its extended version which was James Cameron’s true vision. I’m not exactly a fan of Arnold Schwarzenegger, but I really love his work in T2 as well as in Total Recall. When it comes to James Cameron’s works, I personally prefer T2 over Avatar, Titanic and True Lies.

As for the Terminator franchise itself, it spawned cinematic sequels that only turned up as disappointments. Terminator 2 was indeed the high point of the film franchise and everything really went downhill afterwards. I should state that Terminator: Dark Fate should be avoided as it is not worth your time and money.

Recently, I searched for some comic books that served as sequels to Terminator 2 and I found one from the mid-1990s and it is a direct follow-up! We can find out more in this look back at Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1, published in 1995 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Dan Abnett and Rod Whigham.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins immediately after the end of Terminator 2 with the injured Sarah Connor (with a very exhausted John Connor sleeping) still managing to drive the car in the middle of the night. As she drives, Sarah recalled that she never asked for the responsibility of preserving mankind as it was forced on her way back in 1984. She also recalled the time in Tech Noir when the Terminator almost killed her as she got saved by Kyle Reese.

By morning, Sarah and John reached the desert and returned to the lonely home of her old ally Enrique. Suddenly a man with a shotgun comes out and aims his weapon directly at Sarah. Carrying a gun, John comes out to help his mother…

Quality

John and Sarah Connor.

Let me start with the story and make clear to you readers that this comic book easily defies the conclusion that was set in the movie Terminator 2. If you have seen the film, you should be aware that the way it was concluded made sure there is no more future war and no more Terminators. Like the 2003 movie Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, this comic book just kept on pushing the concept that Judgement Day and the war with the machines are still inevitable and that Terminators from the future would only continue to arrive to hunt and kill John. As such, the hard struggle for Sarah and her son continues.

That being said, this comic book really pushed hard with its sequel approach. Remember what happened in the steel mill in Terminator 2? Several personnel investigated the facility and one particular detective arrived searching for Sarah Connor who has been labeled as an escapee from the state hospital. Inside the steel mill is the severed left arm of the Terminator (which got stuck to crushing mechanical wheels as seen in the 1991 movie) which is the storytelling key the comic book creators used to justify this sequel.  

To the comic creators’ credit, they did their research about T2 and even made references to other characters of that movie. As a result, this comic book appears loaded with fan service.

Even though it has many references and connections to the 1991 movie, this comic book also has some completely new stuff to expand on T2’s concept. The destruction of Cyberdyne’s facility in the movie resulted an emergency meeting of a corporation’s board of directors (and a certain senator) which creatively sets up further conflicts as well as struggles for Sarah and her son.

In terms of writing, this comic book’s story is cohesive enough. As for the art, the quality is fine and most notably, the illustrator managed to somewhat capture the likeness of Linda Hamilton on Sarah Connor.

Conclusion

The severed Terminator arm as the single factor that justified this sequel somewhat.

I can say that Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995) is a surprisingly satisfying read mainly due to its writing and artistic quality. While its push to justify a sequel barely succeeds, there is more good stuff than negative ones overall. As far as making sequels to Terminator 2 is concerned, this one is somewhat more believable than the 2003 movie.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $19.

Overall, Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995) is satisfactory.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prime #18 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Ultraverse! In this return to the Ultraverse, we will examine another mid-1990s issue of Prime who became a resident of the City of New York as a result of Kevin Green and his mother relocating there.

Last time around, a huge monster (clearly inspired by Godzilla) arrived in New York and Kevin had no choice but to change into Prime to save people. While his heroic act saved lives and spared the city from further damage, Prime still was not spared from the growing speculation that he molested children in California (which by today’s standards is a ravaged state as a result of unrestrained influence of the Left as well as economic complications).

So what will happen next to Kevin/Prime the more time he spends in New York? We can find out more in this look back at Prime #18, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and Gerard Jones, and drawn by Kirk Jarvinen and Keith Conroy.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Prime (standing behind a podium with a crowd in front of him) and the people getting surprised when Turbo Charge (note: his debut in issue #17 was overshadowed by the events of that comic book) suddenly arrived on stage holding civilian clothes and declaring he is Prime’s new partner.

Turbo Charge whispers to Prime that he arrived to help him by pretending that the clothes are his (note: the clothes actually belong to Kevin). He then speaks out to the audience stating distorted details. Just as members of the news media start asking Turbo Charge questions, Prime grabs him and flies away to leave the crowd behind.

As they got far enough, Prime tells the Turbo Charge he has no intention to accept him as a partner…

Quality

Prime’s private life as Kevin remains hard as ever.

As mentioned already, Turbo Charge’s debut in issue #17 was overshadowed by what happened in that comic book. That being said, the story here made up for it not only by investing more pages to emphasize Turbo Charge but also dramatize his personality which was done in a pretty satisfying fashion. Like Prime, Turbo Charge’s life has gotten complicated as a result of his ability of super speed and his personal desire to do good even though he is a teenager with so much to learn.

What I find delightfully surprising in this comic book is the presence of Manhattan Project, a powerful character whose dedication to protect New York’s people from ultras (which he wants to neutralize) leads him to a big fight with Prime which alone has to be seen. It is quite enjoyable.

As for Prime himself, there is a good amount of pages dedicated to his alter ego as Kevin still struggling to adjust to life in New York. It should be noted that key elements from issue #17’s story impacted her perception of Prime (a secret Kevin still keeps successfully). The characterization here for the protagonist is really good.

Conclusion

The fight between Prime and Manhattan Project is a must-see.

Prime #18 (1994) is a really good read. It has a fine balance of storytelling, characterization and spectacle from start to finish. I should also state that the New York setting is looking good as far as telling Prime’s story goes.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prime #18 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of this comic book costs $10.

Prime #18 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Mantra #18 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Ultraverse! We take another journey into the Ultraverse through the exploits of Mantra whose story and character development got more intriguing since after the conclusion of the Archimage Quest.

Last time around, Lukasz and Eden took their relationship even further The infiltration of Aladdin’s secret facility took place and Mantra even met a certain tycoon (best known for interacting with The Strangers). The events of the last issue then continued into the Godwheel mini-series and into this next Mantra comic book I’m about to review.

Are you excited yet? What do you hope to see with regards to Lukasz and Eden? We can find out what happens next in Mantra #18, published in 1995 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Mike W. Barr and drawn by Scott Lee.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside a high-tech facility. An executive named Paul expressed that the laboratory will never be operational in time for the new year as a result of what happened previously. Several armed men are on the floor searching.

Suddenly, a pink portal opens with Lukasz (in a male body) and Mantra (now occupied by Eden’s soul) coming out. The two just came back from much struggle in another realm and Eden has not yet fully familiarized herself with Mantra’s body and magic. Noticing Eden/Mantra’s hesitation, Lukasz takes action against the armed men. Eden slowly blasts a few enemies before Lukasz saves her from being attacked from the rear.

Suddenly, someone from nowhere throws a few gas grenades at them…

Quality

The romance weakened by the art style.

Starting with the storytelling, the plot in this comic book can be quite jarring with regards to Lukasz and Eden as this one took place after the Godwheel mini-series. How Eden fully became Mantra (which is her rightful body of flesh in the first place) is fully explained in the said mini-series.

The romance between Lukasz and Eden here is easily the biggest selling point of this comic book. After going through rough action and misadventure in Godwheel, it is in this comic book where the two really express love for each other in the flesh. This is a welcome change considering how long we’ve seen Lukasz occupy Eden’s body followed by Lukasz and Eden being spiritually linked with each other. This one marks the start of a new chapter of the Mantra series. As for what the cover of the comic book showed, that is something you will have to discover for yourselves and it is worth the read.

Sadly, I should state that I found the art by Scott Lee here looking sub-par. There is this cartoony aesthetic to all the characters and there were shots in which their bodies looked disproportionate from certain angles. Lee’s take on visualizing Boneyard, Warstrike, NecroMantra and others all looked cartoony. This is the weakest looking Mantra issue I’ve read as of this writing.

Conclusion

Lukasz in a male body, Eden in Mantra form.

Once again, author Mike W. Barr succeeded in advancing the story and character developments with Mantra #18 (1995) putting the series into another storytelling phase with Lukasz (the long-time Mantra) and Eden as separate, living beings more involved with each other than ever before. The art quality this time went down a lot but the storytelling saved the comic book from turning into a disaster.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Mantra #18 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $21.

Overall, Mantra #18 (1995) is satisfactory.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #14 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of DC Comics! By this time, the road for Wonder Woman 1984’s run in the movie theaters around the world is ending. That being said, the next way for people to avail of the said movie is the anticipated 4K Blu-ray release of it. That is something I am looking forward to and I am not fond of video-on-demand streaming when it comes to big movie productions (which are best enjoyed in the movie theater). Recently, I’ve heard buzz the Wonder Woman 1984 will be released on 4K Blu-ray and Blu-ray formats within the first-half of 2021, and there is also buzz those will be released this coming April. Again, there is still no official launch date yet for Wonder Woman 1984 in optical disc format but once the announcement has been made, I’ll update you all.

Now we can focus on the post-crisis Wonder Woman comic books of the late 1980s. Last time around, the Challenge of the Gods story saw Diana/Wonder Woman and her mother Queen Hippolyte together as well as the deformed, petrified presence of a certain demi-god who abused the queen very long ago.

Want to find out what will happen next? We can see what follows in this look back at Wonder Woman #14, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story by George Perez and Len Wein. Perez drew the comic book with ink work done by Bruce D. Patterson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Wonder Woman rushing back to into the deep darkness. While flying through the air, she recalls the details about the death of Pan (the son of Hermes) as well as the manhunter who murdered and then impersonated him causing his own destruction. While justice has been served, she wonders why must so many battles end with senseless slaughter.

Suddenly, to her shock, she sees her mother Queen Hippolyta laying down on the rubble helpless as Heracles (the son of Zeus) struggles with carrying the entire weight of paradise island upon his shoulders. Heracles tells Wonder Woman to begone, stating that there is no place for such as her.

Realizing that Wonder Woman is Hippolyta’s daughter, Heracles tells Diana to take her mother away quickly. Wonder Woman carries her mother and flies off heading towards the surface where their fellow Amazons are waiting…

Quality

Steve Trevor and Etta Candy.

I’ll start first by confirming that this story is a very strong conclusion to the Challenge of the Gods storyline (started in issue #10 followed in issues #11, #12 and #13) complete with clear impact on the Amazons (both emotionally and socially) as well as on the deities of Olympus. Clearly, George Perez and Len Wein organized themselves and prepared the storyline’s structuring, concept and post-event direction early.

As expected, the fantasy and mythological elements are very well portrayed giving the comic book’s story a richly layered structure and solid quality. There is a lot of dramatic stuff here as the tale involving Wonder Woman, her fellow Amazons and the deities of Olympus who all got affected by the conclusion of the storyline. With regards to the presence of Heracles, I do recommend re-reading Wonder Woman #1 (1987) so that you will not only understand the background details but also feel the overall impact of his role in this story. More on the storytelling, there are themes about forgiveness, justification, fulfillment and diplomacy.

Apart from Wonder Woman, the Amazons and the deities, there is a very intriguing sub-plot about Steve Trevor who, at this point of the post-Crisis DC universe, is not Diana’s love interest but rather a supporting character whose heritage is somewhat linked with the Amazons.

Conclusion

This is a magnificent looking art at the start of the story.

Wonder Woman #14 (1988) is truly a great comic book to read! Not only is this a pretty powerful conclusion to the Challenge of the Gods storyline, it succeeded in defining Wonder Woman not only as brave and strong, but also dutiful, focused and compassionate. I should state that the events in this comic book really marked another notable turning point in the overall narrative of the post-Crisis Wonder Woman monthly series.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #14 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $30 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $60.

Overall, Wonder Woman #14 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at X-Men #4 (1992)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and X-Men fans! Previously, I reviewed X-Men #3 (1991) which, at the time of its release, marked the end of the era of Chris Claremont who spearheaded the development and storytelling of the X-Men since the mid-1970s. Along the way, he clashed with X-Men books editor Bob Harras behind the scenes at the headquarters of Marvel Comics which was a factor to his departure. It is notable that Claremont returned to Marvel in 1997 as editorial director.

Going back to 1991, Marvel had Jim Lee as their top-notch talent to sell loads of X-Men comic books to buyers. Inevitably as Claremont departed, Marvel bet big on Lee and supported his move to set a new creative direction for the X-Men.

With those details laid down, here is a look back at X-Men #4, published in 1992 by Marvel Comics with a story by Jim Lee and John Byrne. Lee drew the comic book with Scott Williams as the inker.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins in a secret facility in the South Pacific. A sleeping figure wakes up and the men wearing protective suits near him carefully observe his moves. Suddenly, the men died horribly. The figure, with white-colored skin and long blond hair, says, “Who has brought me back from the dark domain of death? Who has summoned Omega Red?”

Behind a protective window, a man starts talking to Omega Red and he shows him a picture of Wolverine (in his civilian identity). Omega Red recognizes Logan…

Quality

Gambit and Rogue in the heat of action.

Being one of the first X-Men comic books published in the so-called post-Claremont era, this comic book has a solid story and a lively presentation of the X-Men’s Blue Team members. I figured that John Byrne delivered the solid dialogue given his previous experience of working on X-Men comics (as an illustrator) as well as being the writer and artist of the memorable The Man of Steel mini-series (with DC Comics, rebooting Superman in the post-Crisis era).

While the basketball scene had true-to-character portrayals of Wolverine, Gambit, Psylocke and Jubilee complete with stylish dialogue per character, there is consistency on the portrayal of Moira MacTaggert who is understandably struggling to recover given the events of X-Men #1 to #3. The same goes with Charles Xavier. The way the script was written with strong focus on the established characters, it’s almost as if Chris Claremont never left.

The biggest feature of this comic book is the debut of the deadly mutant Omega Red who is of Russian heritage and Russia’s own parallel to the United States’ own super soldier Captain America. In pop culture, Omega Red is one of the top villains in comic books ever and this comic book sets up his sudden rise to prominence. Symbolically, Omega Red is a co-creation of Jim Lee and John Byrne and it is pretty fitting for this comic book of the post-Claremont era to feature him.

Conclusion

You love basketball?

There is no doubt that even by today’s standards, X-Men #4 (1992) is a great read and a landmark issue in X-Men comic book history. Given its content, this one will always be remembered as the start of Omega Red who later on proved to be one of the deadliest villains Marvel’s mutants ever encountered. The villain went on to appear in the video games X-Men: Children of the Atom, Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter and Marvel vs. Capcom 2.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of X-Men #4 (1992), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $125 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $375.

Overall, X-Men #4 (1992) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prime #17 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Ultraverse! By now, many of you should be familiar with Prime who was one of the main heroes of the Ultraverse as published in the 1990s by Malibu Comics. Many times in comics, Prime fought with lots of thugs, some very notable enemies (check out Prime #5), got involved with other notable ultras as part of a team (check out UltraForce #0 and #1), got involved awkwardly with ladies like Mantra and the mother of Kelly, and more.

Surely, Prime (who is a teenage boy named Kevin under all the muscle) went through a lot. Now how about seeing the overly muscular ultra hero take on a monster about as large as Godzilla? We can all find out in this look back at Prime #17, published by Malibu Comics in 1994 with a story written by Len Strazewski and Gerard Jones, and drawn by John Statema.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins somewhere on the bottom of the ocean. King Atalon raises an entire island to the surface of the sea claiming it will be new court of his and his people. Doing so, he releases a gigantic monster to the surface and immediately it encounters a ship. The monster grabs two men from the ship and eats them.

In the city of New York, Kevin Green and his mother have a meal together in a first-rate deli. His mother expresses her thoughts about how hard it was for him to move away from California at a short notice, leaving behind his school and his friends. She stressed that something had to be done in response to what happened to their family.

She recalled that Kevin’s father acted so strangely and left them. That being said, she did not want to make the situation worse by smothering him. Kevin thought to himself how could he tell her mother the truth that he and Prime are one and the same, and he went through different versions of his alter-ego each with a different attitude.

As Kevin and his mother traveled via the subway of the city, the giant monster in the Atlantic Ocean continues to create havoc moving towards New York…

Quality

A possible Godzilla reference spotted.

From a storytelling point of view, this comic book felt like the start of a new chapter in the life of Kevin/Prime. The sudden relocation to New York sparked Kevin to look back at the events he went through in the past year which, in my opinion, helped serve as an exposition dump to help readers – especially new ones – catch up with all the details on Prime. It was also interested to learn that Kevin’s mother is from New York and her action on having themselves relocate all the way from the West Coast was convincingly done. I also like the drama that unfolded when the mother brought Kevin to a spot to view the Statue of Liberty from a distance only to be shocked and hurt over the fact that the statue’s head is missing. Through really nice dialogue, you can feel the mother’s pain.

The highlight of this comic book is the uncanny match-up between Prime and the Godzilla-sized monster. While the battle between them was not too long, showing Prime struggle with fighting the monster while thinking a lot about strategizing, searching for weaknesses and even expressing concern for his mother all added a good layer of depth to bother the hero and the encounter.

Visually, I like the work done here by John Statema. His art on the monster was clearly Godzilla-inspired but he gave it a unique look of its own, especially with the way he drew its scaled which Prime found to be very tough. I also enjoyed Statema’s take on the events that happened in Prime’s life as seen in the exposition dump early in the comic book.

Conclusion

The big exposition dump.

Prime #17 (1994) is a fun read and definitely has the look and feel of a new turning point in the life of a superhero. It has excellent dialogue, a pretty nice build-up leading to the big battle between Prime and the monster, and most notably there is a good amount of dramatizing through Kevin’s mother.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prime #17 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $8.

Overall, Prime #17 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Ravage 2099 #7 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

If there is anything that truly defines the 2099 universe of Marvel Comics, it is the sci-fi element. Science fiction that not only shows one possible future of Marvel’s United States but also how immense futuristic technology is present all around the people who are undoubtedly impacted by it all. Whether it is within the metropolis (think Spider-Man 2099) or in the wilderness (think X-Men 2099), the sci-fi element clearly defines the 2099 universe.

In the middle of it, there was Ravage (co-created by the late Stan Lee and artist Paul Ryan) who went from a corporate executive to a violent rebel. In my last review, Ravage escaped the toxic island and returned to the metropolis only to realize that his pals Dack and Tiana have been captured again.

To find out what happens next, here is a look back at Ravage 2099 #7, published in 1993 by Marvel Comics with a story written by Stan Lee and drawn by Paul Ryan.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Ravage struggling to save Dack and Tiana from different captors, both already separated from each other. Ravage springs into action taking control of the remaining section of the Fantastic Four’s Fantasticar and decides to try to save Dack while facing floating armed personnel. After successfully getting to two armed men hit each other, Ravage chases the flying craft and thanks to his gadget, he is able to hit one of the craft’s personnel.

After a few moments of struggle, Ravage manages to save Dack. He tells the young guy he will drop him off somewhere safe. Dack tells him that he will be blasted on sight by the Public Eye personnel and this convinces Ravage to take him on his dangerous attempt to rescue Tiana from the aquatic invaders…

Quality

I wonder if the social justice warriors (SJWs), the feminists, the socialists and so-called progressives will find this scene offensive to their feelings and beliefs.

Let me first point out the obvious weaknesses of the script Stan Lee wrote: repetition and lack of creative ideas. Alchemax’s Anderthorp Henton being portrayed as ruthless and evil towards his loyal employees yet again – check. Tiana captured again – check. Dack captured again – check. Anderthorp Henton being nice to ladies – check. Tiana being eroticized visually in a state of helplessness – check. Having these repetitions seem to be Stan Lee’s way of filling the script just to ensure there are 22 pages of story to be made.

In fairness to the late Lee, he did something new for this comic book – revealing the underwater lair of the aquatic invaders and having Ravage and Dack involved. The change of environment made this comic book look and feel refreshing, and this added a lot to the science fiction element of the 2099 universe of Marvel. However, it was all a temporary place to show off Ravage doing something heroic. In terms of storytelling, Lee missed out on the opportunity to emphasize to readers why they intend to invade the surface, why are they obsessed on eliminating the human race, and what is the true value of their planned on experiment on naked Tiana (other than learning how to process oxygen).

Another positive point here is Ravage doing heroic acts at last. It’s all technically a repeat of the title character saving his companions but ultimately it helps this comic book achieve its goal of portraying Ravage as a determined and flawed hero. It definitely is much better than his struggle to survive in the toxic island.

Conclusion

An action-packed chase.

As usual, Ravage 2099 #7 (1993) is another flawed comic book like the previous issues. It has, however, more good stuff than bad stuff. True, the repetition of creative elements hurt it but it still has enough entertainment value to justify a read.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Ravage 2099 #7 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $8 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $26.

Overall, Ravage 2099 #7 (1993) is satisfactory.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Mantra #17 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

A lot has changed with Mantra since the title character got more involved with the elements (both in character and in plotting) with the different realms which led to a particular quest about her captured leader Archimage. In the last issue, not only were Lukasz (the male soul who occupied the body of Eden Blake and became Mantra) and Eden Blake continued to spiritually interact with each other (going as far as having feelings for each other), the impostor living with Eden’s family was revealed.

Considering the events that took place since then, one has to wonder where would Mike W. Barr lead the Mantra series to next. We can all find out in this look back at Mantra #17, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story by Barr and illustrations done by Jason Armstrong.  

The cover.

Early story

The story begins in a secret, high-tech facility of Aladdid. Lukasz (as Mantra) quietly begins infiltrating the place by taking out one of the armed guards and doing what he could to gain more access around. Eden tells Lukasz that she does not the fallen guard to be hurt and that her time is almost over. She reiterates to Lukasz that he has to live her life and take care of her children.

Shortly after wearing the Aladdin guard uniform, Lukasz starts to get involved with the other guards. He witnesses a wetware engineering work in progress which reveals a scientist working on a so-called patient (the subject).

Suddenly, the subject begins to move causing trouble in the laboratory. Realizing that the engineer is having trouble dealing with the subject already moving, the Aladdin guards (including Lukasz in disguise) enter the place. As the two guards fire their weapons against the subject, Lukasz instead uses one of the computers to gain access to classified information…

Quality

Time with Eden’s family.

After going through the mysticism, the intrigue and threads of Mantra’s past in the last several issues, this comic book’s story is a nice change of setting and concept. Instead of the fantasy elements that pretty much dominated Mantra stories, this one has a sci-fi flavor as well as corporate intrigue (which is pretty prominent in Prototype comics and Hardcase comics) and the very concept of this story is pretty good.

Along the way, the story shows the aftermath of the death of a certain uncle named Moe (once occupied by Thanasi, a long-time rival of Lukasz’s), Mantra having a reunion with a key character from issue #1 and even meeting a notable supporting character from The Strangers comics. The good news here is that Mike W. Barr wrote a very strong script that not only resonates with Ultraverse fans but also tell a cohesive story packed with spectacle, character development and something very notable that happened (which I never anticipated).  

Conclusion

Infiltrating a top secret facility.

Mantra #17 (1994) is not only fun and compelling to read. It is also refreshing and, as if the cover was not obvious enough, marked the beginning of a new chapter in the life of Mantra.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Mantra #17 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $15.

Overall, Mantra #17 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prime #16 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Ultraverse! We revisit the Ultraverse yet again, only this time it will be through another issue from the Prime monthly series.

In Prime #15, an issue illustrated by the great George Perez, the overly muscular hero entered a certain Hollywood house which was believed to be the headquarters of a drug trafficking operation. What Prime found inside were not only junkies but also zombies and terrifying illusions that tested him mentally and emotionally.

So what happened next? We can find out in this look back at Prime #16, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and Gerard Jones, and illustrated by Joel Thomas.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Prime struggling with questions from the media. Journalists ask him about his involvement with teenage boys, the truth about his youth crusade, and if he was recruiting boys for gangs. Prime, who is really teenager Kevin Greene inside, bluntly states he cares about teenagers and will do justice for them.

Questions about a certain backpack he (as Kevin) dropped and the young boy’s clothing that he carried bothered him deeply, making him remember he dropped a backpack filled with clothes at the office of Baker. Realizing he screwed up, he gets violent with the reporters who ask him hard questions.

Suddenly police helicopters arrive telling Prime he is under arrest….

Quality

The debut of Turbo Charge.

Set shortly after the events of UltraForce #2, the story here is pretty powerful on its own as the stakes were raised by Strazewski and Jones to develop Prime even further than before. Many times, we have seen how being Prime made life more complicated and harder for Kevin Green. In this comic book, the complications have gotten even bigger and deeper as the media has turned hostile towards Prime affecting not only Kevin but also his romantic interest Kelly and her mother. As if that was not enough, there are many fanatics of Prime called “Prime Gangs” who are so obsessed with their muscular idol, they serious believe they can do anything to honor him…even though it means harassing other people. Also notable here was the way Kevin (as Prime) tries to save his fragile friendship with Kelly. There is also the appearance of Turbo Charge here. Clearly, the writing here is really great.

I cannot say the same for the art done by Joel Thomas. His art style is too cartoony and he drew people’s bodies and faces lacking precision. Many times I had trouble recognizing Kevin, Kelly, her mother and other supporting characters. Visually, this is a letdown.

Conclusion

Powerful talk between Prime and Kelly ruined somewhat by the weak art.

Back by very strong writing, Prime #16 (1994) is absolutely engaging to read and it truly served as a crucial turning point in telling the continuing story of Prime. In many ways, the dramatic events here serve as the climax of all the dramatic build-up seen in the previous Prime issues. This comic book’s portrayal of the overly hostile and unrelenting media will easily remind any reader about today’s news media in which unprofessional journalism, secret agendas, political bias, conspiracy between media and political groups, malice and political activism among so-called journalists are now the norm.  

The dramatic turn of events here are so powerful, Turbo Charge’s presence really got overshadowed a lot. Visually, this comic book has some of the weakest looking Prime art I’ve seen.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prime #16 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $8.

Overall, Prime #16 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com