A Look Back at Prototype #6 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Wrapping up the details after the end of a major crossover is undoubtedly challenging for any comic book creator. Doing such aftermath work includes settling the interaction between characters from different comic book series, explaining the details behind what happened, how the event itself affected the rest of the comic book universe and more. The crossover I’m referring to her specifically is Break-Thru, the memorable year-ender story of the Ultraverse.

This time, we will see the post-Break-Thru side through the armored hero of the Ultraverse in this look back at Prototype #6, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story co-written by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason, and drawn by Roger Robinson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins just hours after the ultras of Earth fought the epic battle on the moon. Prototype and Prime fly their way back to Earth, with the latter serving as a makeshift shield from the heat of re-entry. By this time, the two ultras just concluded their meeting with the Strangers back on the moon, and it was there the idea of trailing Prime was discussed. For Prototype, doing this was crazy especially since it was only days since he fought Prime back on Earth.

Along the way, Prototype (pilot by Jimmy Ruiz specifically) intends to talk with Stanley Leland whom he believes set him up and almost got him killed with the mission to the moon…

Quality

4
After Prototype and Prime parted ways with the Strangers…

This comic book’s story is compelling. Not only does it wrap up the details of Break-Thru through the viewpoint of Prototype, it excelled with telling the story of Bob Campbell (the original Prototype pilot). As the build-up for Bob has been established in the previous issues, his story here resulted a nice pay-off and most notably, it raises the stakes when it comes to the narrative of the Prototype series (which consistently told parallel stories of Jimmy and Bob). I also enjoyed the introduction of a new villainess as well as the continued portrayal of corporate intrigue (this alone is one of the best features of the Ultraverse narrative).

The visuals done by Roger Robinson are pretty good and they really brought the script to life. Robinson also scored well with making the action scenes look dynamic without going over the top.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #6 is a great read! Not only does it wrap up the Break-Thru crossover through Prototype, it also has solid storytelling turning points not only with Bob Campbell but also Jimmy Ruiz. There were no boring scenes and I love the way the script emphasized the culture of corporate America within the Ultraverse and how it affects ultras.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #6 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #6 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #9 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Having reviewed the first eight issues of the Hardcase series, I should say that the title character is easily one of the best protagonists of the entire Ultraverse and the late author James Hudnall deserves credit for the storytelling and character development. Hardcase made it in CBR’s 2016 article about what is being missed from the Ultraverse.

As written in the said CBR.com article: Created by James Hudnall, Hardcase was one of the first superheroes in the Ultraverse, forming a team with some other early superheroes. They called themselves “The Squad,” and soon became extremely famous. However, tragedy struck when the team took on a powerful villain, who killed almost all of them, with only Hardcase remaining as The Squad’s only surviving member. Of his three other teammates, two died and one was comatose. He retired from being a superhero and instead became an actor, portraying himself in major motion pictures. When the Ultraverse officially began, Hardcase was pulled out of retirement to become a superhero once again.

Before he passed away on April 2019, Hudnall expressed his support for US President Donald Trump and pointed out that the media has been lying and the ones who are fascists are the rioters who attacked people since the 2016 election.

With all that information presented, let’s take a look back at Hardcase #9, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Hudnall and drawn by Brent Anderson (the same guy behind the 1982 graphic novel X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills).

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Tom Hawke/Hardcase spending time with the comatose Linda. He tells her about what he went through recently. The narrative shifts to a few days back with his work in filmmaking. He meets with Choice whom he has gotten close with for some time.

Inside a trailer, the two discuss relationships and the complexity that comes with acting with regards to emotions.

A short time later, a huge monster attacks Hardcase in public. The monster tells him: “You’re as egotistical as all the rest. It’ll be a pleasure to send you to your grave.”

Quality

9
This is one of many scenes of action brilliantly drawn by Brent Anderson.

As the adventures with the Strangers and the Solution are over, this particular comic book served its purpose well – the further development of the relationship between Hardcase and Choice. The way Hudnall scripted this comic book showed a nice balance between romance, superhero spectacle (note: this comic book is loaded!) and the key element of maturity (with regards to dealing with love from both the past and the present).

With regards to the art, Brent Anderson’s debut with the Hardcase series is pretty solid. I like the gritty touch of the visuals he used on the characters, most notably Hardcase and Choice.

Conclusion

5
Hardcase and Choice in Hollywood.

No doubt that this is another solid Hardcase story. I enjoyed this from start to finish (which was emotionally powerful and symbolic). Hardcase #9 marks a new turn in the life of the the title hero.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #9 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $7.

If you are looking for original Hardcase #9 art by Brent Anderson, click here.

Overall, Hardcase #9 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #2 (1992)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Previously, I found RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 an underwhelming crossover comic book. This was due to the way the story was structured and it had a protagonist who was not interesting to follow. It does not help that RoboCop himself did not appear much in the story while the Terminators were nothing more than window dressing.

Now that the exposition and build-up has been done in the first comic book, we can find out if RoboCop and the Terminator will finally become more prominent in this look back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #2, published in 1992 by Dark Horse Comics with a story written by Frank Miller and drawn by Walt Simonson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in the dark future. A young boy finds himself in the middle of a war zone surrounded by explosions and blasts. With a broken leg, he crawls up the steps of a ruined place only to find himself facing a T-800 Terminator which kills him. The Terminator, acting like a human, raises the boy’s dead body to other Terminators which raised and clenched their firsts to acknowledge victory.

The story then moves back to 20th century Detroit, Michigan. An ED-209 operating for the city hospital fires at a dog until it got stopped by police officers. RoboCop arrives and enters the hospital with his gun catching everyone’s attention. He enters the room where the young lady from the far future is resting. Knowing that RoboCop is responsible for Skynet and the eventual war between man and machines, she remains hostile towards him.

In response to RoboCop’s inquiry about the weapon used during the shooting incident (that happened at the end of issue #1), the lady responds saying, “You really don’t get it. Do you, monster? Well, you will get it when they plug you into Skynet in a copy of years—when your mind makes the Terminators possible—when you mind starts a war that wipes us out, maybe then you’ll get it!”

Even though he is mostly machine and has been computerized RoboCop (Alex Murphy) was compelled to deeply analyze what the lady from the future said. He decides to investigate…

Quality

24
Hard-hitting action between the two pop culture icons is plentiful and satisfying!

With regards to presentation, I should say that the creative team bounced back big time here delivering lots of fun stuff about RoboCop and the Terminator. The plot, for the most part, is well written and there was a lot of room to have Detroit’s cyborg cop go into conflict with more than one Terminator finally paying-off the build-up that dominated the first issue. There were even a few scenes of dark humor spotted here and there. When it comes to fusing the respective creative elements of the RoboCop and Terminator intellectual properties, this was nicely pulled off. Even ED-209, a rival of RoboCop’s in the movies, got involved in battling a T-800. When it comes to the art, Walt Simonson’s work here is satisfactory at best. He does a decent job visualizing the hard action between RoboCop and the T-800 but there is that cartoony aesthetic of Simon’s that I found to be out of place within this crossover.

Conclusion

14
Three Terminator units in different sizes.

I’m happy to say that fans of both RoboCop and the Terminator will have a lot of good stuff to enjoy in RoboCop versus The Terminator #2. The build-up and heavy exposition in the first issue paid off nicely in this comic book. Those who got annoyed with the lady from the future will be relieved that her spotlight in this issue was heavily reduced. As expected, the fight between RoboCop and the T-800 is brutal and plentiful although the impact could have been stronger had someone else illustrated this comic book. By the end of the story, I was very satisfied and ended up looking forward to the next issue.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of RoboCop versus The Terminator #2 (1992), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy costs $6.

Overall, RoboCop versus The Terminator #2 is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Hardcase #8 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! It’s time for another story about Hardcase, who is one of the more interesting characters of the Ultraverse as far as I am concerned. With seven issues already reviewed, I can say that the development of Hardcase really worked well thanks to the combined efforts of the creative team with James Hudnall as lead writer. The previous issue I reviewed was part of the Break-Thru crossover of the Ultraverse.

Now we can start looking back at Hardcase #8, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins a short time after the end of the Break-Thru crossover, set on the surface of the moon. A team hired by Rex Mundi tries to reach a spaceship (provided by Mundi) only to see it fly off without them.

Inside the ship, Hardcase, Choice and The Solution celebrate not only because they are going home but also because they beat their Mundi-hired rivals (who destroyed the ship of Hardcase and companions).

Back on the moon, the ones who got left behind reached out to Rex Mundi who is actually inside the Los Angeles headquarters of the Choice Corporation. He starts plotting to get Choice back…

Quality

7
Hardcase, Choice and The Solution in space.

As a story, Hardcase #8 pretty much serves like a wind-up of the events of the Break-Thru crossover but managed to follow Hardcase and Choice enough to keep fans of this comic book series engaged. While there is very little room for character development, at least this comic book emphasized Hardcase’s interactions with The Solution which was believable to follow. When it comes to further magnifying the core elements of the Ultraverse, I like the way James Hudnall emphasized the potential rivalry of power between Rex Mundi (the king) and Regina.

As for the visuals, artist Scott Benefiel’s work here was good and I liked how he illustrated The Solution and the rest of the supporting characters. There were a few shots in which his art resembled that of George Perez.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Hardcase #8 is an entertaining read even though the title character had to share the spotlight with other characters of the Ultraverse, which is understandable since this is a post-Break-Thru tale. What it lacks in character development, it bounced back nicely with build-up and suspense.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Hardcase #8 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $11.

Overall, Hardcase #8 (1994) is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

 

 

COVID-19 Crisis – New Quarantine Facility in Muntinlupa Opened

COVID-19 Crisis – New Quarantine Facility in Muntinlupa Opened

The City Government of Muntinlupa announced today that the recently turned-over quarantine center within the city (Barangay Sucat) from the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) has officially started accepting local residents who tested positive for COVID-19, as well as those who were suspected to have contracted the said virus for isolation. The facility opened on July 8.

Quarantine-Munti-24
Mayor Jaime Fresnedi inspects the facility in Barangay Sucat. (source – Muntinlupa PIO)
Quarantine-Munti-1
Fully equipped personnel working at the facility. (source – Muntinlupa PIO)
070920
A look at the Barangay Sucat facility that officially opened on July 8. (source – Muntinlupa PIO)

Already two units of Emergency Quarantine Facility (EQF) in Barangay Sucat serve as an isolation facility and additional triage to decongest hospitals in Muntinlupa as part of local government’s efforts to curb COVID-19 in the communities.

As of July 9, has 542 confirmed cases with 310 recoveries, 192 active cases, 40 deaths, 338 probable cases, and 228 suspect cases.


Latest City Government of Muntinlupa details sourced from their official media release.

For more South Metro Manila community news and developments, come back here soon. Also say NO to fake news, NO to irresponsible journalism, NO to misinformation, NO to plagiarists and NO to sinister propaganda when it comes to news and developments.

A Look Back at Solitaire #2

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

It’s been quite some time since I reviewed Solitaire #1. What I like about the Ultraverse crime-buster is that he was designed to be a very agile combat expert with the ability to regenerate. Apart from being a very capable fighter, Solitaire is also very skilled detective and has lots of connections (with informers). Some comic geeks compared him to Batman and Wolverine but within the Ultraverse, Solitaire is unique.

Now we can take a look back at Solitaire #2, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story by Gerard Jones and art by Jeff Johnson (inked by Barb Kaalberg). This particular comic book is connected with the Ultraverse crossover event Break-Thru.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in Small Town, U.S.A., a place described to be happy with the air full of laughter, the chatter of children and music played by a band. Solitaire arrives and quickly an arrow was launched at him and missed. The place’s defenders are already aware of him.

The place turns out to be an amusement park filled with tourists who paid for rides, sights and fun. In the middle of it, Solitaire is on a mission. Another arrow was fired at him but thanks to his reflexes, he grabbed it, allowed himself to fall into the water. A lady with a bow and arrows arrives to check on him but Solitaire quickly got back at her, restraining her.

After he asked where the bomb is located, she points to the moon. Suddenly another arrow is fired and hits Solitaire on his left thigh…

Quality

9
Fierce opposition towards Solitaire!

Now that the establishment of Solitaire’s origin and superhero nature has been done, this comic book’s story is pretty adventurous to read. The good news is that it is a well-made adventure that not only delivered the fun but also established Solitaire’s place in the Ultraverse (thanks to the link with the Break-Thru crossover). When it comes to developing Solitaire not only as a crime fighter but as a person, I like the use of flashbacks from his past recalling his time as a much younger visitor to the amusement park complete with his mother remaining a hole in his memory.

More on the story, it is not only adventurous but also packed with action. This time, Solitaire does not fight the stereotypical thugs but rather lady defenders of the Moon Man who are so willing to do their jobs, they attack Solitaire even if it means harming the tourists. The build-up leading to the encounter with the villain was nicely paced and was a worthy pay-off.

When it comes to the art, this is one very nice-looking comic book thanks to Jeff Johnson. The illustrator knew how to pace the story visually and when to add punch to the action scenes and stunts.

Conclusion

4
Imagine yourself touring a theme park and actually witnessing a real attack towards a trespasser.

Solitaire #2 is a fun-filled Ultraverse comic book that is worth reading again and again. What it lacked in character development, it bounced back big time with action and adventure elements.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Solitaire #2, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $8.

Overall, Solitaire #2 is recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 (1992)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Back in the early 1990s, I was already a fan of the Terminator and RoboCop mainly due to their respective first movies released in the 1980s which became cinematic classics. While RoboCop 2 never came close to the quality of the 1987 original movie, Terminator 2: Judgment Day literally rocked the cinemas and went on to become one of the greatest film sequels ever made. Back then, there was a lot to be excited for over the two entertainment franchises.  One day during my high school days (note: there was no social media and Internet access in the Philippines was not yet established), I learned from reading a comic book industry magazine that a crossover comic book mini-series matching the Terminator and RoboCop together. That news excited me a lot and before the end of 1992, I bought myself a copy of the comic book RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 (note: this one has gone out of print).

With the history explained, let’s all take a look back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #1, published in 1992 by Dark Horse Comics with a story by Frank Miller (note: the same successful comic book creator who actually worked on RoboCop movies in Hollywood) and art by Walt Simonson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in the far future wherein human society has been ruined and the world became a constant battleground of a war between powerful machines and desperate humans. Inside a facility being invaded by the machines, a lady working for the rebels has been using computers (via brainfeed) in the battle with Skynet. As far as she knows, leader John Connor has been right in telling her that it was a human mind that merged with software and got linked with Skynet. She points to the 20th century historical figure Alex Murphy/RoboCop as the one responsible for the war.

Before Skynet’s machines reach her, she strips naked and made a desperate trip back through time. She successfully makes a hard landing into the middle of a city in a time before the war. After struggling with the sudden change, she arms herself and sets off to kill Alex Murphy…

Quality

16
Something is off with the pacing of the action here.

Let me start that this particular mini-series has a very intriguing concept that made it stand on its own (as opposed to simply referencing core concepts of the movies). This is about RoboCop’s technology being used to establish Skynet and this launch comic book emphasized that nicely.

When it comes to storytelling done with this particular comic book, things felt very uneven. For a comic book that strongly focused on the Terminator and RoboCop, this was mainly the story of the rebel lady from the future whose mission was to eliminate officer Alex Murphy in a bid to change the future. While she is portrayed to be highly determined and works by action, the character is never interesting and not worth investing your attention to.

For his part, RoboCop was literally placed on the backseat in this story and he makes his first appearance in the 2nd half starting with crime-busting. Considering the lack of spotlight, the sci-fi icon himself is not even interesting to follow which is disappointing.

The clear representation of evil here is Skynet and its army of Terminators. To say the least, the machines here make a worthy menace to read and somewhat made up for RoboCop and the lady rebel being uncompelling characters.

When it comes to the art, I should say that Walt Simonson’s visuals are not great to look at. There were crooks that had a cartoony aesthetic on the faces, Terminators that don’t even come close to their cinematic designs and some images looked rushed. At least Simonson’s RoboCop looks recognizable and was satisfactory with the action.

Conclusion

6
The target: Alex Murphy/RoboCop.

I still remember how underwhelmed I got after completing RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 the first time way back in 1992. It’s even more underwhelming by today’s standards. Of course, the comic book was essentially a build-up issue with the pay-off supposed to happen in the remaining issues. Its best selling point is the fusion of RoboCop and Terminator concepts that helped establish its own universe.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 (1992), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $17 while the near-mint copy of the platinum edition costs $170.

Overall, RoboCop versus The Terminator #1 (1992) is satisfactory. That being said, I would not recommend paying a lot of money for this comic book. Find a near-mint copy priced below $10.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #3 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Are you geeks and comic readers ready for another trip back to the good old days in the 1990s when the Ultraverse line of comic books was published by Malibu Comics in competition with the superhero offerings of Marvel, DC and Valiant Comics?

Here is a look back at Prototype #3, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story by Tom Mason, Len Strazewski and drawn by David Ammerman.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Jimmy Ruiz (current Prototype user) in a private jet with his corporate companion Hastings. He’s feeling restless over the delay at the airport.

On a large commercial airplane, a gang of armed, masked men suddenly enter stating they claim the plane in the name of Terrordyne, Inc. Passengers naturally got frightened.

From a distance, Jimmy noticed the trouble happening and told Hastings to call security.

Meanwhile in Chicago, an armed lady talks to someone over the phone. In New York, men start to do some work on the body of Glare, a huge green-skinned figure. He is being prepared for Aladdin…

Quality

11
The money shot of this comic book.

Unsurprisingly, stories of heroic struggles (told through Jim and Bob respectively), corporate intrigue and fighting the bad (in this issue: new villain Heater) were the most defining elements of this comic book. The good news here is that there is still a cohesive story told by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski. One of the more notable parts of the story was Bob Campbell’s reuniting with Felicia which for me made a lot of sense since I already read Prototype #0. Once again, David Ammerman did a good job visualizing the script.

Conclusion

5
Glare in the possession of a group.

Prototype #3 is another fun read that has a careful mix of spectacle, character development and corporate culture exposition. While it does not have the horror element of issue #2, its focus on the corporate side and secret operations made this comic book deep. At the same time, this comic book solidly established Jimmy and Bob as the protagonists of the series.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #3 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4. The near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $13.

Overall, Prototype #3 (1993) is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at X-Men Adventures #14 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Last time I reviewed an issue of X-Men Adventures, it was the 13th issue which served as the first half of a two-part adaptation of the animated series’ adaptation of the literary X-Men classic storyline Days of Future Past. It was a compelling and fun comic book to read.

Then I saw the cover of X-Men Adventures #14 which had a nicely drawn cover but instantly spoiled key elements of the 2nd part of the Days of Future Past adaptation. What does the comic book have left to show?

We can all find out in this look back at X-Men Adventures #14, published in 1993 by Marvel Comics with a story written by Ralph Macchio and drawn by Nick Napalitano.

Cover
The spoileriffic cover.

Early story

The story begins with Bishop (who came from the dark future on a mission to change events and prevent the darkness from taking over by aligning himself with the X-Men) attacks Gambit whom he identifies as the traitor responsible for the downfall of the X-Men and society. In response, Rogue, Jean Grey and Jubilee intervene to disrupt the conflict paving the way for Wolverine and Cyclops to restrain Bishop.

Bishop insists that everything will change for the worse if Gambit lives to fulfill his destiny: to kill a prominent politician who opposed mutants.

After some squabbling between the X-Men, the situation cools down and Professor X/Charles Xavier announces that he and some members will travel to Washington, D.C. where he will address the senate committee on mutant affairs…

Quality

2
Chaos in the headquarters of the X-Men!

In terms of writing, this comic book carries a lot of punch on its own. It’s a compelling read and like the animated series episode that served as its source, it took its time to build up tension before a twist or a scene of spectacle happens. As expected, it is not a scene-per-scene recreation compared with the animated episode and that’s just fine for me. I only wished the comic book creators retained the animated episode scene in which Bishop tells Wolverine that Gambit’s destined act was the Canadian’s fault, which led to Wolverine memorably saying: “I still can’t believe it.”

More importantly, the story offers readers a nice exploration about how the public and the Federal Government of the United States would react with mutants. To see US Senator Robert Kelly harshly question Professor X if his school functioned for pro-mutant propaganda is quite striking.

When it comes to the art, Napalitano’s work here is a drop in quality and style when compared to Andrew Wildman’s art. His art is not terrible and he exerted effort on translating the script into images but the work looks rushed. There were some weirdly drawn faces of Rogue, Xavier and Wolverine to name some. The action scenes meanwhile lacked punch.

Conclusion

3
The dark future of the X-Men and their society.

While X-Men Adventures #14 served its purpose on completing the adaptation of Days of Future Past, it failed to deliver the great stuff even though the script was strong. The sub-par art of Napalitano really dragged the presentation down making the comic book end with a whimper.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of X-Men Adventures #14, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $6 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $21.

Overall, X-Men Adventures #14 (1993) is satisfactory.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #2 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Over a year ago, I reviewed Prototype #1 and published other Ultraverse comic book reviews that had the armored superhero involved. In recent times, I reviewed Prototype #5 since that comic book was the first of a 2-part crossover between Prototype and The Strangers. Since I already reviewed Prototype #0 to get a good look at the origin of the armored superhero (composed of two different pilots or users working for a corporation), it’s time to go back to one of the early issues of Prototype to discover more of the ultra-hero.

This is my look back at Prototype #2, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story co-written by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason, and drawn by David Ammerman.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

 

The story begins with Prototype (piloted by Jim Ruiz) battling with mechanized opponents as he tries to achieve something. It turns out, the entire encounter was a virtual reality training mission which ended after Jim overloaded his armor’s circuits during the heat of training.

While taking off his armor, Jim discusses some matters with his assistant. He recalls his hard battle with an over-sized, muscular opponent whom he noticed to be communicating with someone. The opponent died which gave the public the false impression that Prototype killed him.

Meanwhile over the headquarters of Ultratech, Marjorie listens to Stanley ranting about the negative press their company got recently. As soon as Stanley calms down, Marjorie noticed that Jim was in trouble according to tech read-outs. They analyzed the risk they are taking with Jim being the Prototype pilot as they make sure nobody would learn that there is more than one active Prototype in their company. Marjorie states that she has taken the initiative and assigned someone to take care of Bob Campbell (the other Prototype pilot)…

Quality

5
Jim Ruiz is already struggling with the stress of piloting Prototype.

In terms of storytelling, this comic book is quite gripping as it deals with elements of corporate politics, heroism and even horror. Without spoiling too much, I should say that the battle near the end of the story brought back memories of the 1984 movie The Terminator which itself combined elements of horror, film noir and sci-fi. There was not much room for character development but that was no problem considering the strong storytelling. For his part, David Ammerman’s drawings were nice and detailed to look at, especially when the story focused more on Bob Campbell.

Conclusion

2
The money shot of the comic book!

No doubt about it. Prototype #2 is a very good and entertaining comic book to read. It successfully told two tales (one on Jim and the other on Bob) and cleverly mixed genre elements to deliver solid storytelling. Not only that, this comic book marks one of the early connections between Prototype and Prime as the story took place after the events told in Prime #4.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #2, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #2 (1993) is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com