A Look Back at Wonder Woman #19 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of DC Comics! Today is the first day of March of 2021. Do you know what that means? It means that Wonder Woman 1984’s scheduled release on DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Blu-ray is just 29 days away! Even though I still have not seen the movie (which as of this writing has not been released in movie theaters here in the Philippines) and even though social media showed that WW fans are divided over it, I still went ahead ordering the 4K Blu-ray combo online. Just today, the online retailer gave me an important update as to when the 4K Blu-ray combo will arrive.

Personally, I’m excited to watch Gal Gadot play the Queen of Superheroes again and her performance in the 2017 Wonder Woman movie is phenomenal and captures the essence of the icon! I am also interested to see how director Patty Jenkins handled the storytelling as she herself co-wrote the screenplay.

More on Wonder Woman, I should say that I really love the way she was redefined by George Perez and Len Wein in the post-Crisis era of DC Comics. Today, we will find out what happens next to her during her time in Greece in this look back at Wonder Woman #19, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story written and drawn by George Perez (with Frank McLaughlin on the finishes).

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with a short look back at the end of issue #18 which saw Wonder Woman fighting several monsters that surrounded her. Suddenly a powerful blast hits her and knocks her out.

Vanessa, who survived thanks to Wonder Woman’s help, is found by her mom Julie who was accompanied by several armed Greeks. Vanessa states that the scroll she got from her uncle Stavros seemed to attract the monsters which drew a response from local rebel Katina Leikos who belongs to a group that oppose the fabled witch on the nearby island. She states that if they don’t stop the witch, she will destroy princess Diana/Wonder Woman.

Inside the old structure on the said island, Wonder Woman wakes up finding herself on the floor chained by the neck and wrists. Located very near her is Circe, the enchantress who is the daughter of Hyperion and Perseis. The enchantress tells Wonder Woman that it is her destiny to execute her…

Quality

Julia Kapatelis is more involved with the action and mission.

Of all the comic books that I’ve reviewed so far on this particular monthly series in the post-Crisis era, this one is easily the darkest and most grim Wonder Woman story. It also has the heaviest emphasis on monsters and sorcery, complete with sinister rituals and connections to Greek mythology.

As expected, the story here further develops Wonder Woman and her place in man’s world but with emphasis on destiny and legacies. In this case, destiny related to the shared history between Wonder Woman’s fellow Amazons and Circe (who is DC Comics’ own take on the false Greek goddess) which puts the superhero icon in a rather complex situation. For Circe, Wonder Woman’s innocence means nothing because destiny and hatred matter a lot more. The way George Perez wrote, Circe in this particular issue proved to be more menacing than Ares and is also the most sinister villain of Wonder Woman’s.

More on this comic book, I can declare that it is right here where you will get to see the Queen of Superheroes in her most vulnerable and most helpless state yet. For several pages, you will see Wonder Woman struggle not only against Circe and her monsters, but also with the revelations of history. You will also get to see Wonder Woman’s emotional limits pushed.

Regarding the supporting cast, I really enjoyed seeing Julie Kapatelis really putting her academic skills and expertise to great use as well as getting involved in the action. With her Greek heritage and connections with the locals clearly defined, Julie got a good amount of the spotlight among the characters and nicely contributed to the story. I also love the part when Julie said that Diana (Wonder Woman) is like a daughter to her which really emphasize the bond of love and trust between them.

Conclusion

Wonder Woman bravely fights the monsters of Circe.

As far as the visit in Greece goes, Wonder Woman #19 (1988) really ramped up the stakes with Circe’s evil presence emphasized a lot while having Wonder Woman in a vulnerable state which added to her character development in this particular monthly series. It is indeed a very well written tale by Perez who proved to be capable of pushing the boundaries while redefining Wonder Woman in the post-Crisis era. Apart from being the most sinister villain in this monthly series so far, Circe is the complete opposite of Wonder Woman.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #19 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $42 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $44.

Overall, Wonder Woman #19 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #18 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors, fellow geeks and fans of Wonder Woman! Last time, I found George Perez’s standalone writing of the story about Wonder Woman discovering Greece and its connections to her people’s heritage a really good story. For much of the post-crisis Wonder Woman monthly series’ early stage, the stories were done by Perez and the late Len Wein. In issue #17, Perez not only succeeded in developing Diana/Wonder Woman further, he also captured nicely the wonder of discovery of new places and astonishing aspects of life while traveling overseas.

Of course, issue #17 was not purely a tourism story through the eyes of the Queen of Superheroes. There was an obvious build-up of a new villain who is aware of Wonder Woman’s presence in Greece.

What will happen next? Who could the new force of evil be? We can find out in this look back at Wonder Woman #18, published by DC Comics in 1988 with a story written and drawn by George Perez with ink work done by Dick Giordano.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins deep in the darkness of limbo. Light sparks suddenly as Zeus, Hades and Poseidon arrive in the search of their father called Cronus. Zeus retrieves the Olympian pact. After further talking, they join forces in lighting a flame to burn the pact to make way for something new.

Meanwhile in a hospital in the Greek isle of Cephalonia, Diana wakes up surrounded by Julia Kapatelis, Vanessa, a doctor and other Greeks. Diana states that some kind of aura seemed to clutch her in a chilling grip which Julia dismisses and believes that her Amazon friend was simply tired from all the months-long pushing herself since returning from Themyscira.

Julia introduces Diana to Theophilus Ventouras and his nephew Demetrios. The older Ventouras is the owner of the wealthiest estate on the islands. He tells Diana that the governor asked him to meet her at the dock and reveals to her that a local boy was killed by a wolf which some car calling it as a “magia”.

As they continue talking, a nurse listens to them carefully just outside the door of the room they are in. She learns about Ventouras’ offer of assistance to Diana and quietly leaves. Some time later just outside the hospital, the nurse (named Angela) reveals to a man named Mikos that Diana and her group will be going to Ventourata the next day…

Quality

Without hesitation, Wonder Woman moves to save lives.

I can start by saying that this is another well-written tale by George Perez. Apart from the continuing focus on Wonder Woman’s discovery of Greece, the elements of fantasy, intrigue, suspense and even horror have been used more in this comic book compared to the previous issue.

When it comes to characterization, Diana’s close relationship with the Kapatelises is deepened further as the story explored the already established Greek background of Julia. I also found engaging Wonder Woman’s unflinching moves to search for Vanessa and get her out of trouble any way she could.

For those of you who are aware about the lack of superhero spectacle in issue #17, I can share to you that there definitely is more action in this comic book and it is all nicely presented by George Perez.

Continuing what began in the previous issue, Perez ramped up further the build-up of the new force evil awaiting Wonder Woman. I won’t reveal who it is but rest assured, this comic book’s ending is pretty strong and easily justifies the build-up.

Conclusion

Diana and Julia treat each other like family.

Wonder Woman #18 (1988) successfully continued the redefining of the Queen of Superheroes in the post-Crisis era and George Perez really delivered great stuff as well as a very solid story here. From start to finish, there is a lot to enjoy and examine in the story.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #18 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $41 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $84.

Overall, Wonder Woman #18 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

For Wonder Woman fans, be aware that the movie Wonder Woman 1984 will be released in a 4K Blu-ray disc combo on March 30, 2021. Read my article for the details and, if you have decided to order, do it now at Amazon.

A Look Back at Action Comics #500 (1979)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

To publish a five hundredth issue of an extensive monthly comic book series is clearly a major milestone for any publisher. To do the math, it takes a whole year to publish 12 issues on a monthly schedule. To reach five hundred issues on a monthly pace will require forty-one years and eight months’ time to publish.

Way back in the late 1970s, DC Comics achieved the said milestone with their extensive monthly series titled Action Comics which is often identified with the world’s most famous superhero – Superman! Take note that DC Comics started in 1935 while Action Comics #1 (the first appearance of Superman) was published a few years later.

Going back to the 500th issue of Action Comics, it is easy to wonder what DC Comics’ talent came up with to celebrate the milestone. That being said, we can all find out more in this look back at Action Comics #500, published by DC Comics in 1979 with a story written by Martin Pasko and visualized by Curt Swan and Frank Chiaramonte.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Superman arriving at a pavilion named after him at the Metropolis World’s Fair. Countless people welcomed with lots of cheering as he lands near the mayor in the presence of the famous entrepreneur J. Robert Arngrim. Also present were Superman’s closest friends Lois Lane, Lana Lang, Jimmy Olsen and Perry White.

After the formal opening, Superman leads a large group of people as their tour guide. Together they arrived a wide hall containing the Krypton exhibit showcasing alien technology, architecture and life on Superman’s home planet. In response to a request by Arngrim, Superman reluctantly agrees to do a demonstration of the mind-prober ray, a machine Superman himself invented as a boy mainly to retrieve memories from his subconscious.

As the Man of Steel takes his seat on the machine in front of the tourists and Arngrim, an unidentified person located in a secret facility prepares to invade Superman’s mind…

Quality

Teenage Clark Kent gradually becoming Superboy.

To make it clear, this 500th issue of the Action Comics monthly series is an extensive, no advertisements tribute to Superman and I can say that the comic book creators really went all out to present lots of stuff to please Superman fans.

As such, the story was written to help the newer fans of the time to be more familiar of the legacy of Superman (note: this was years before Crisis on Infinite Earths happened) by revisiting and dramatizing established events of the Man of Steel’s legacy such as Jor-El (Superman’s father) failing to convince the Kryptonian science council members that their world was doomed, Superman sent to Earth as a child in a rocket before Krypton’s destruction, getting raised by an American couple after arriving on Earth, becoming Superboy (note: another pre-Crisis element), getting a job at the Daily Planet, welcoming Supergirl on Earth, and so on.

Superman leading the tour.

Of course, Superman does not reveal key details of his personal life to the people during the tour and such recollections were presented to delight us readers. Still, there is richness in the writing and the art. Even though I am already familiar with DC’s icon and the Superman-related mythos, I still had a lot of fun reading the events of Superman’s past, particularly his early years as the adopted son of the Kent couple who in turn did their best to adjust to his super abilities while raising him with good values and discipline.

While the recollections from Superman’s past are engaging, the present-day tour at the Superman pavilion is itself quite fascinating. There were displays of supervillains such as Lex Luthor, Braniac and Parasite. There was even a collection of the different types of Kryptonite. What really nailed the present-day story was a nice twist that allowed for some new superhero spectacle and intrigue to take place.

Conclusion

The first stop of the tour – Krypton exhibit!

While this portrayal of Superman is already outdated given the time of its release, Action Comics #500 (1979) is still a lot of fun to read and it is indeed a great tribute to DC’s most famous superhero. If you are a Superman fan who has gotten sick and tired of the way DC Comics reshaped and modernized Superman since after the end of Crisis on Infinite Earths, this comic book could be refreshing for you. It is also a lively piece of DC Comics’ history.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Action Comics #500 (1979), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $210.

Overall, Action Comics #500 (1979) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #17 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

When was the last time you traveled overseas not to have fun the usual way (partying, spending time in bars, watching movies or stage plays, and the like) but rather to immerse yourself into history by visiting several historical sites? When you plan to travel overseas, have you thought about pursuing the wonder of discovery?

Welcome back, Wonder Woman fans and comic collectors! It has been almost a year since I started publishing retro reviews of Wonder Woman comic books from the post-Crisis age of DC Comics drawn by the famous George Perez. I can say that I really enjoyed the modernizing of the Queen of Superheroes done by Perez along with the late Len Wein. In fact, my enjoyment on the post-Crisis Wonder Woman is greater than what I had for the New 52 Wonder Woman. For those who love Wonder Woman movies, check out my retro review of the 2017 Wonder Woman movie and my feature about the No Man’s Land scene. If you are into the latest movie Wonder Woman 1984 starring Gal GadotChris Pine and Kristen Wiig, be aware that the 4K Blu-ray combo of it will be released on March 30, 2021. I already ordered a copy of it.

Going back to what I mentioned earlier, discovering new places can be tremendous experiences for those who travel abroad. With those details laid down, we can finally start this look back at Wonder Woman #17, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story written and drawn by George Perez with ink work done by Dick Giordano.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins as a white bird flies high in the sky in the middle of dark clouds and bolts of lightning. The bird is carrying a message and as it continues to move forward, the darkness fades away as light and calm clouds set in.

In Wakefield, Massachusetts, Diana Prince/Wonder Woman receives her special United Nations (UN) passport from Etta Candy. It turns out that Julie Kapatelis is in Athens, Greece, making arrangements for Diana’s first overseas trip in man’s world. As they talk, Etta reveals that Steve Trevor is aware of the connection between Wonder Woman’s costume with his mother.

As Vanessa (Julie’s daughter) comes down from the second floor, Steve Trevor enters the house carrying a bird carrying a message. Even as she recognizes the bird, she is amazed to discover that it arrived there all the way from Themyscira. The message carried by the bird is from Diana’s mother, Queen Hippolyte. She begins to read the message in the car with Vanessa on the way to the airport…

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Diana visits and discovers Greece.

I’ll start by pointing out that this is the first issue of this particular monthly series to be written entirely by George Perez (note: Len Wein was involved with the script for issue #16) and, as I read this comic book, he wrote well and succeeded in further developing Wonder Woman’s personality just as she discovers more of man’s world and its connections with her fellow Amazons.

In this comic book, Wonder Woman (with Vanessa) travels to Greece for an arranged visit with her mentor Julie anticipating her arrival. Upon arriving in Greece, a lot of people warmly welcomed Wonder Woman who in turn got reunited with Julie in the presence of her Greek friend Stavros. In relation to the opening paragraph of this review, this is the story of Diana’s discovery of Greece, its people, its culture and legacy. The way Perez wrote and visualized her discovering and learning of the Greek sites really emphasized her thoughts as her perception of man’s world and its connections to her people and her culture builds up.

Unlike the previous two issues, this story is much heavier with character development and Perez’s writing is indeed engaging. As you read Diana’s words and thoughts, you will experience intrigue and even relate to her experiencing a great wonder of discovery. Also worth reading are her thoughts about Superman.

Apart from the focus on Wonder Woman, this comic book also paid attention to the intrigue that happened among the deities of Olympus – including Heracles – who are still recovering from the great disturbance caused by Darkseid. Oh yes, the story also marked the start of the build-up of another supervillain for Diana to face.

Conclusion

In the airplane on the way to Greece.

While it clearly lacked a strong conflict between good and evil, the wonder of discovery as well as the in-depth characterization made Wonder Woman #17 (1988) a must-read. George Perez, who is best known for his artworks, proved to be a very solid writer and it should be noted that he went on to write a whole lot more stories about the Queen of Superheroes.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #17 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $42 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $42.

Overall, Wonder Woman #17 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at The Strangers #21 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and geeks! We go back yet again into the Ultraverse through the exploits of The Strangers which by this point are still adjusting over Atom Bob’s betrayal. The previous issue did not show much of the team as it told a mostly solo story of Zip-Zap.

With those details laid down, here is a look back at The Strangers #21, published in 1995 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Steve Englehart and drawn by Paul Abrams.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside a different type of aircraft. The Strangers, now with new member Teknight and old teammate Yrial, discuss matters about the unconscious Atom Bob whose body has been laid on a platform. In response to Yrial’s question about what should they do about him, Lady Killer (Atom Bob’s ex-lover) states that if a cure for him exists, they will find it. If no such cure exists, she states that the traitorous member should never wake up again.

After being informed by Lady Killer that she knows a private clinic in Europe that may have the solution to their problem, the Strangers get off the plane knowing that they should keep confidential what they just learned.

Shortly after watching Lady Killer’s private plane take off, Candy/Electrocute tells her teammates that they should just get away for a while. She decides to drive Grenade’s car. Suddenly, the car explores leaving Candy heavily damaged…

Quality

Here’s a look at Teknight, the new member of The Strangers.

This is another intriguing yet original story of The Strangers penned by Steve Englehart. To begin with, this is the first issue of this monthly series that saw Teknight actively taking part with the team and his being a new addition opened up really interesting conversations and interactions with existing team members like Grenade.

As the cover already shows, this one has spotlight on a severely damaged Candy. Still, it does not mean that this is a solo story about her (like Zip-Zap’s tale in issue #20) rather it is still a team story with Candy’s tragedy serving as a major plot point. Along the way, there were some scenes focused on Teknight which opens up interesting background details about him. Zip-Zap, who had the spotlight for most of issue #20, proves his heroic value in this comic book.

There are other notable Ultraverse details here and there that would encourage you to check out other UV comic books. What exactly those details are is for you to read this comic book and find out for yourselves.

Conclusion

Zip-Zap doing something heroic.

The Strangers #21 (1995) is intriguingly enjoyable to read. Steve Englehart deserves a lot of credit for keeping the stories of this series fresh, fun and engaging. For his part, Paul Abrams did a fine job with the art and he successfully captured the overall style of presentation of the series and his take on the characters kept them recognizable to my eyes.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of The Strangers #21 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $27.

Overall, The Strangers #21 (1995) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Superman Annual #10 (1984)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Before DC Comics ended their original superhero multiverse with Crisis on Infinite Earths (1985-1986) to restart all over again, there were a whole lot of stories about Superman ranging from the dramatic stuff, the epic tales and right down to the most outlandish tales.

As a kid, I was fortunate enough to buy myself a copy of a 1984 Superman comic book, the cover of which really intrigued and caught my interest. It was a Superman annual comic book with a $1.25 cover price which was somewhat high at the time. Its cover showed the Man of Steel himself carrying a sword pointed up.

That image made me wonder: Why would Superman have to use a sword when he is so powerful and capable without weapons? Where did that sword come from? Who made it in the first place? Is the sword so special to Superman?

With those details laid down, here is a look back at Superman Annual #10, published by DC Comics in 1984 with a story written by Elliot Maggin and drawn by classic Superman artist Curt Swan.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins in a space where a group of diverse people composed of aliens and humans are gathered together watching a live video feed Superman on a large monitor above their heads. As it turns out, the Man of Steel is in space working to prevent meteoroids from entering the planet below him. He then speeds off into space heading back to Earth.

Along time ago deep in the galaxy, a big bang effect took place creating several new fragments in the vacuum of space and among them is a long, rough object that resembles a sword. As an unknown amount of time passed, the long object gradually turns into a smooth looking sword complete with a sharp blade and a letter “S” on one end that is the same as the one Superman carries. It is referred to as the sword of Superman!

In Metropolis, Clark Kent is passed by his officemate Jimmy Olsen who mentioned that he is rushing to interview the billionaire industrialist Oswald Mandias. Two days have passed and Jimmy Olsen remained missing. As his boss Perry White heads on to the office, Clark remains and changes into Superman when the coast got clear.

As the Man of Steel flies off into the city, a Galaxy Broadcasting live report on TV shows Lana Lang reporting from the Kennedy Space Center where the new space shuttle Magellan is about to make its first-ever commercial flight to launch a mysterious new communications satellite owned by Mandias Industries…

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Clark Kent/Superman being a complete stranger to others added a lot to the story.

Being an annual, I can say that the Sword of Superman story was well-written and nicely visualized by the creators which made it fun and engaging to read. It is a Superman story that further adds to his being an essential hero of the original DC Comics multiverse and a key factor here is the somewhat outlandish concept that the sword that he gained was an original material of the universe from the big bang and even had connections to the unseen omnipotent force.

This story is not a simple, straightforward tale about Superman gaining a weapon required to defeat the supervillain King Kosmos. In fact, the sword opens up events that made the Man of Steel reevaluate himself, his situation and the people around him. King Kosmos, who is a time-travelling villain from the future (first appearance in DC Comics Presents Annual #2), served not just merely as the opposition but also adds a good amount of complexity within the reality of the story. For one thing, it is very intriguing and also refreshing to see people of Metropolis (even Clark’s friend Jimmy Olsen) failing to recognize Superman. This is a one-of-a-kind story of Superman that must be read, even though it is not really an epic tale.

Conclusion

The return of King Kosmos!

I personally enjoyed reading Superman Annual #10 (1984) the first time back in 1984. The fact here is that after re-reading it recently, I do confirm that it is still an enjoyable comic book to read, and I am not even a Superman fan anymore. That is quite something! This is indeed a really good piece of Superman history from the pre-Crisis era. It also touches on themes about omnipotence and being whole with the entire universe.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Superman Annual #10 (1984), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $35 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $70.

Overall, Superman Annual #10 (1984) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

Wonder Woman 1984 4K Blu-ray combo set for March 30, 2021 release!

Calling all fans of Wonder Woman, fans of superhero movies and all other geeks! Some great news for you all and it’s related to what I observed and wrote before.

It has officially been announced that Wonder Woman 1984 (starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine and Kristen Wiig) will be released in a 4K Blu-ray combo (4K Blu-ray with Blu-ray disc plus a digital copy) on March 30, 2021 and already orders for it are being accepted at Amazon.com Check out the image below.

Coming out on March 30, 2021! This early, orders for Wonder Woman 4K Blu-ray combo are being accepted at Amazon.com

Some relevant numbers about Wonder Woman 1984 4K Blu-ray combo below…

Video

Codec: HEVC / H.265

Resolution: Native 4K (2160p)

HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10

Original aspect ratio: 2.39:1

Audio

English: Dolby Atmos

English: Dolby TrueHD 7.1 (48kHz, 24-bit)

Subtitles

English SDH, French, Spanish

Discs

4K Ultra HD

Blu-ray Disc

Two-disc set (1 BD-50)

Playback

4K Blu-ray: Region free

2K Blu-ray: Region A

If you are only planning to watch Wonder Woman 1984 in 1080p, there is also the Blu-ray disc version as well. You order it at Amazon now.

Going back to the 4K Blu-ray combo, I am very delighted over the confirmation that Wonder Woman 1984 will be presented in genuine, native 4K resolution. By comparison, the 4K Blu-ray of the 2017 Wonder Woman film was an upscaled 4K presentation (read: fake 4K).

Even though I still have not seen Wonder Woman 1984 and I deliberately avoided streaming and digital piracy of it, I went ahead ordering the 4K Blu-ray combo this early. Now the wait to watch it in the comfort of home truly begins!

Remember that 4K Blu-ray with native 4K visuals is much better than streaming!

For more Wonder Woman-related stuff, check out my recent retro comic book reviews as follows: post-Crisis Wonder Woman issues #10, #11, #12, #13, #14, #15 and #16.

Check out my retro movie review as well as my feature about the No Man’s Land scene of the 2017 movie.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #16 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, literature enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of Wonder Woman! Reflecting on my previous retro comic book review, I can only imagine how disturbing it could be to me personally if there was a big event meant for a charitable purpose which gets overshadowed with the presentation making me the greater highlight.

That’s precisely what happened in Wonder Woman #15 (1988). As soon as Princess Diana/Wonder Woman arrived at the fair (which involves Myndi Mayer’s big-time publicity work and promotions) named after her (note: the Wonder Woman Fair was conceptualized for the benefit of needy children), she was astounded at first to see so many people anticipating her arrival. When she notices the gigantic poster with her image on it, she got disturbed by it.

“Look at the poster,” Wonder Woman thought to herself. “It’s almost as if they worship me! Yet I still find all this exploitation somewhat embarrassing!”

For the newcomers reading this, the post-Crisis Wonder Woman is a native of Themyscira which has a population of women called Amazons, led by her mother Queen Hippolyte. While her status among her fellow Amazons is notably very high, there are publicity gimmicks and no merchandising of her in Themyscira. Truly the world of man is vastly different to her.

To find out what happens next, let’s take a look back at Wonder Woman #16, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story written by George Perez and the late Len Wein. Perez did the layouts while Bob Smith did the finishes.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with people disrupted by the Silver Swan’s presence at the Wonder Woman Fair, a gala event organized on behalf of the needy children of Boston. Due to the Silver Swan’s sonic attack, the Ferris wheel begins to fall apart causing Wonder Woman to intervene and help those riding it.

As Steve Trevor successfully saved a passenger from falling to pavement, armed people (including two police officers) fired their guns at the Silver Swan who is protected by the protective shield made by her low-level humming. At another location in the fair, Maxine Sterenbuch sits by a tree tearfully agonizing over how her dear friend Valerie Beaudry became the Silver Swan all because of Henry C. Armbruster.

While in the air, Valerie realizes that it is her fault that people’s lives are in danger. Her objective was to hit Wonder Woman who proved too fast for her. Behind the scenes at a secret facility, Henry C. Armbruster tells Valerie to calm down and prepare for a level 3 force blast.

Then she screams so powerfully…

Quality

The conflict between Wonder Woman and Silver Swan is very engaging to read.

Let’s start with the writing. The story is a nice mix of superhero spectacle, intrigue and has some elements of science fiction. As a story set after Diana’s return to man’s world, it is a worthy conclusion to the events that started in issue #15. The conflict between Wonder Woman and the Silver Swan is laced with espionage and intrigue, and the arrogant Armbruster is the main force of evil behind the scenes. The spotlight on Maxine Sterenbuch was understandably reduced this time around as the conflict between Silver Swan and Wonder Woman took center stage.

As a story set after the Challenge of the Gods storyline, this comic book continues the further development of Diana as she endures the challenges of not just dealing with the people, places and events around her in man’s world but also the feelings she starts developing for one of the major superheroes of the DC universe. More on her development, Diana experiences for the first time the consequence that comes with being a celebrated figure in man’s world and she realizes that doing charity is much harder to fulfill.

When it comes to Valerie/Silver Swan, she is indeed an interesting rival opposite Wonder Woman although her lack of freedom and will prevents her from reaching her true potential as an anti-hero figure. To find out why, I urge you to read this comic book.

Conclusion

Early in the comic book…

Wonder Woman #16 (1988) is another solid post-Crisis Wonder Woman story as it further highlights a modernized Silver Swan and portrays her as an interesting form of opposition against the title character. The battle and interactions between the two are really engaging to read. As mentioned earlier, it is nice conclusion to the events that started in issue #15 and succeeds in further developing Diana as she spends more time in man’s world.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #16 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $33 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $70.

Overall, Wonder Woman #16 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at The Strangers #20 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Ultraverse. We revisit the Ultraverse once again to follow the continuing stories of The Strangers. Last time around, the team found itself struggling with adjusting to life without Atom Bob. For Lady Killer, the loss is very painful not only for her leadership of the team but also on her heart as she had a relationship with him.

What will happen next? How will the team move forward without Atom Bob? We can all find out in this look back at The Strangers #20, published in 1995 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Steve Englehart and drawn by Sam Payne.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside the home of a mother and her son enjoying indoor basketball. Their happiness got disrupted when a large, muscular man with blonde hair crashes through their door. With him is another man named M.C. who tells the lady that he and his companion want to “borrow” her son. As the mother resisted, the slimmer man knocks her out while Beater (the large guy) grabs her son.

Elsewhere, The Strangers react to the official trading card featuring Candy/Electrocute. Leon/Zip-Zap is familiar with the value of trading cards and he shows them his card of a basketball player called Missile Monroe from his days as a rookie.

As he is eager to have the trading card signed by the basketball player, Zip-Zap heads on to the city. On his way, he notices people gathered outside Holt’s Gym which he heard is the place where Missile Monroe works out at. He then uses his super speed to go past a few more people, climb up the wall, step on the ledge and look through the window. Zip-Zap sees the basketball player shooting indoors in the presence of a friend.

Sensing opportunity, Zip-Zap decides to sneak in and make his grand entrance to meet Monroe..

Quality

Zip-Zap slams!

I can start by saying that this comic book’s story is much less of The Strangers and more about their youngest and fastest member Zip-Zap. Rather than presenting a story about Zip-Zap going back to his old neighborhood, the story is about him meeting someone very important while taking advantage of his own celebrity status as a member of The Strangers (now known by the public) to get to him.

Other his personal obsession with a sports celebrity, this comic book also explores Zip-Zap’s determination to do something heroic without the presence of his teammates. As he is still a teenager, this part of the story alone is intriguing.

Also intriguing is the introduction of two new villains in this series, MC and Beater. How they became powerful and what their connection with Missile Monroe is something you readers should discover. I personally enjoyed what was revealed.

Other than heroic happenings, the story here explores the consequences that come with big money and lucrative deals. There is also the theme about social elevation with regards to the progress a person can make coming from the local communities to the big league. Also the events in this comic book will remind readers to respect the boundaries between them and the celebrities or important people they encounter in person.

Conclusion

Zip-Zap meets Missile Monroe and friend.

Even though it had much less of the team itself, The Strangers #20 (1995) is a worthy and fun read. The story about Zip-Zap going solo temporarily for his pursuit was nicely crafted and the new characters introduced had personalities that were interesting, most notably with Missile Monroe. Apart from characterization, there is sufficient superhero spectacle to enjoy as well. Going back to Zip-Zap, anyone who loves the character will be pleased with the spotlight on him. I should also state that this story shows additional depth to Zip-Zap’s character.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of The Strangers #20 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, The Strangers #20 (1995) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #15 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and Wonder Woman fans! Last time around, the Challenge of the Gods storyline concluded and it really had a lot of twists and profound surprises that really shook the foundation of the post-Crisis Wonder Woman monthly series that was spearheaded by George Perez and Len Win. The Challenge of the Gods started strongly in issue #10 and as each issue was released, the narrative got more intriguing and ultimately served its purpose on defining Wonder Woman as the ever-willing and pure Queen of Superheroes. Along the way, there was significant development of Queen Hippolyte who has been struggling between ruling her fellow Amazons and being a mother to Diana/Wonder Woman.

As the Challenge of the Gods was full of elements of fantasy and Greek mythology, it can be quite challenging for any comic book creator to start the next chapter of the Wonder Woman monthly series’ narrative without reusing the mentioned elements.

In the case of the next Wonder Woman comic book for review here, I can say that the creators literally brought Wonder Woman into the realm of realism and intrigue. With those details laid down, here is a look back at Wonder Woman #15, published by DC Comics in 1988 with a story written by George Perez and Len Wein. Perez illustrated the comic book.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Wonder Woman having a very vivid dream about a certain great hero. After waking up from it, she feels that trying to keep up with all the events of the world must be taking its toll on her. She expressed that she is ill-prepared to deal with new sensations.

“In this world, man and woman long for these feelings. They cherish them. I’ve read how they have even died for them,” Diana said. “And that truly frightens me.”

While Diana is staying at the Kapatelis residence, it turns out Julia (mother of Vanessa) is overseas. She wishes that Julia is with her to discuss what she has been feeling.

Meanwhile at the Ogawa headquarters in Boston, an armed man is using one of the company’s computers to acquire classified information about a subject referred to as Valerie Beaudry. A security guard arrives and decides to investigate as he realizes that his fellow guard was missing (knocked unconscious already). The infiltrator makes short work of him and leaves the building with the acquired information…

Quality

Wonder Woman appears at a major public event.

I can start with the sudden change of tone for the storytelling. Gone are the fantasy and mythology elements of the Challenges of the Gods storyline and fully implemented in this comic book are the elements of intrigue, suspense, assassination and even sci-fi. The story itself is more grounded with reality as far as the post-Crisis DC Comics universe goes and because it is well written, the sudden change of tone and style never felt jarring to me.

While the 9th issue of this monthly series introduced a modern Cheetah, this comic book introduced the modern Silver Swan in the form of Valerie Beaudry (who appears on the cover). The good news here is that the creators took their time in gradually building-up details about Valerie and how she became Silver Swan. By the time Silver Swan appears in the presence of Wonder Woman, her personal details and traits have been developed in a satisfying way. Unlike Wonder Woman #9, Silver Swan’s appearance in this comic book stretches on into the next issue.

Along the way, more new characters were introduced and the most notable ones are connected with Valerie Beaudry. Maxine Sterenbuch, who eerily resembles Wonder Woman’s teenage pal Vanessa but in adult form, has a close connection with Valerie over a period of many years. There was also Henry Cobb Armbruster, a tycoon who wield tremendous power and has been hiring assassins to do his bidding.

Going back to Wonder Woman herself, this issue explores more of her struggle with not only learning more about man’s world and its many divisions, but also the feelings she starts having as she connects more with other people – most notably with one of DC’s biggest icons. To have Julie Kapatelis absent left the creators room to have Diana not only bond more with daughter Vanessa but also strive more on analyzing what she learns in man’s world. The scene in which Wonder Woman notices a huge printed image of her is a vivid reminder about how negative and foolish idolatry is on people.

Conclusion

Intriguing action scene.

Even though it has no fantasy and mythology elements, Wonder Woman #15 (1988) is still a great comic book to read and it succeeds in progressing Diana’s discovery and learning of man’s world. Its introduction of the post-Crisis Silver Swan is memorable and her build-up (specifically her background story) is pretty engaging.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #15 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $35 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $70.

Overall, Wonder Woman #15 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com