A Look Back at Break-Thru #2 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, 1990s culture enthusiasts and comic book collectors! Today we go back to the mid-1990s which was a really wild time for comic collectors. To be more specific, this newest retro comic book review revisits the conclusion of the epic Ultraverse storyline Break-Thru which was illustrated by the late George Perez (1954-2022). I encourage you readers – especially long-time fans of the iconic illustrator – to check out my commemorative article about George Perez by clicking here.

For the newcomers reading this, Break-Thru was a 2-part storyline that creatively involved almost all the main characters of the Ultraverse (The Strangers, Mantra, Prime, Prototype, Freex, The Solution, Hardcase, Sludge, Solitaire and others) who got impacted in varied ways by Amber (of the Exiles) who floated high in the air causing chaos on societies below. Specifically, that was the concept of Break-Thru #1 (1993) and issue #2 has the story continuing with a setting in outer space with the moon as the key destination.

With those details laid down, here is a look back Break-Thru #2, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story scripted by Gerard Jones (plotted by Mike W. Barr, Steve Englehart, Steve Gerber, James Hudnall, Tom Mason, George Perez, James Robinson and Len Strazewski) and illustrated by the late George Perez.

An epic cover by the late George Perez.

Early story

The story begins at the surface of the moon with Hardcase, Choice and the members of The Solution who just survived the explosion (connected with Hardcase #7 and The Solution #4) of the flying saucer they used on their journey. Nearby, the people responsible for the destruction are riding their own flying saucer, scanning the surface of the moon searching for an entity.

Behind the scenes, the very hidden yet powerful Rex Mundi watches and tells Gate that other ultras are seeking the entity. As the saucer floats to a cave detecting the presence of the entity, the occupants get shaken as Prime hits them hard. Prime tells himself that the entity in the cave feels danger from the searchers and he has to protect it as he has been connected with it (refer to Prime #7). After getting blasted in retaliation by the saucer, Prime finds himself hit even more as Rex Mundi’s enforcers suddenly come out of a portal very near him.  

From a distance, Mantra (refer to Mantra #6) sees the fight happening and needs a life force to survive. Elsewhere, Hardcase, Choice and The Solution witness the arrival of a space shuttle. The Strangers and Prototype (refer to The Strangers #7 and Prototype #5) come out together…

Quality

This is classic George Perez presentation of action and characters using multiple panels in a single page.

Starting with the writing, I should mention that all the writers who were involved in plotting this comic book as well as the previous issue should be commended for their combined efforts on making the Break-Thru storyline happen complete with in-universe ramifications, developments and connections to almost all the monthly comic books via the Break-Thru tie-in issue (also check out Sludge #3, Freex #6, Solitaire #2 and Night Man #3). Clearly Break-Thru was planned to be a major turning point of the Ultraverse by involving and mixing most of the major characters together and have them struggle with tremendous obstacles they simply cannot ignore as the stakes were indeed too high.

More on this comic book, the major conflict was set on the moon which proved to be a very unique setting not just for dynamic battles to happen but also to serve as the place where a mysterious and powerful entity is hidden. When it comes to the story, the entity (more science fictional in concept) is mysterious and cleverly not blatantly evil. It is its mysteriousness that makes the entity a worthy force to have the UV’s heroes come after.

The writers added depth to the plot by showing Yrial of The Strangers and Prototype each having their own vested interests to get to the entity and acquire whatever it has that is valuable. At the same time, Mantra and Prime each discovered valuable knowledge about the entity that impacted their perceptions about their purpose as beings with super powers.

Mantra, Prime, The Solution, Hardcase and Choice.

While the story here still has so many characters expressing themselves and releasing expository information, the narrative is a little bit easier to understand and follow compared to issue #1 (which had a lot more information to release via exposition). That being said, the scenes of spectacle became more enjoyable to read and along the way there were some notable character moments to look at.

Visually, this is unsurprisingly a great looking comic book as it was illustrated by the late George Perez. What I love most about Perez’s art style and visual presentation are all here: high details on each character drawn as well as their surroundings, the dynamic approach on setting up the panels on each page, fantastic looking superhero action, and much more! As with Break-Thru #1 and other Ultraverse comic books drawn by Perez, this one is absolutely great to look at and it easily lifts up the visual/artistic quality of the UV and its heroes. As George Perez was involved in the plot of this comic book, the narrative was never overwhelmed by his great art and the artist really exerted a lot of effort on visualizing each and every one of the established UV characters (including the supporting characters).

Speaking of the established characters, I should state that Perez made Mantra’s face (with mask) look a bit more realistic and feminine while Kevin Green has a more convincing teenage boy look, Sludge looks a bit more creepier and Yrial looks visually identical to the way Rick Hoberg draws her. When it comes to the varied physiques of each established UV hero, Perez captured them all perfectly. Clearly the late artist did his research on every character.

Conclusion

The first physical encounter between Prime and Hardcase. Remember this before reading the UltraForce comics.

Break-Thru #2 (1994) is truly an epic Ultraverse story that also worked as a major turning point of the UV as a whole. Compared to other epic superhero stories that Marvel and DC Comics published, Break-Thru is not the usual large gathering of superheroes who have to work together to defeat an evil force that threatens everyone’s existence. It is more about the UV heroes getting together to solve major obstacles before reaching the main destination. By the time I reached the end of this comic book (and its storyline), I experienced great satisfaction not just from Break-Thru itself but also in relation to how the Ultraverse heroes realized what they are living for and what their respective purposes really are about. What also happened in this comic book explains why jumpstart events happened on Earth. Very clearly, this was an epic story that was planned early and even though this was published just months after the Ultraverse first debuted, the characters were developed enough to make Break-Thru’s concepts sensible and acceptable. There is a lot of fun and engagement in this comic book drawn by the late George Perez (who also worked on DC’s Crisis on Infinite Earths and Marvel’s The Infinity Gauntlet).

Overall, Break-Thru #2 (1994) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me with a private message. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me on Twitter at  @HavenorFantasy as well as on Tumblr at https://carlocarrasco.tumblr.com/ and on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/authorcarlocarrasco/

A Look Back at Prototype #12 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Apart from the in-depth storytelling, spectacle and solid characterization consistently delivered by writers Tom Mason and Len Strazewski for the Prototype monthly series of the Ultraverse, I also enjoyed their implementation of corporate intrigue. In fact, the storytelling in issues #7, #8, #9, #10 and #11 also showed corporate intrigue gradually building up leading to something. Without spoiling the story too much, what happened in issue #11 showed a clear change of direction involving Prototype pilots Jimmy Ruiz and Bob Campbell complete with something brewing at Ultratech.

Will the payoff of the corporate intrigue build-up be realized in the next Prototype issue? We can all find out together in this look back at Prototype #12, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski, and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins at the Ultratech tower in New York City. At the lobby, Felicia Campbell gently knocks the guard out with an injection and takes control of the security desk to allow Bob Campbell/Ranger and Jimmy Ruiz/Prototype (wearing a “goofy” outfit) to come in and, together, they move to the basement for a certain need (of Jimmy) – the Prototype armor.

Suddenly Ultratech’s newest hire Prototype Mark III fires a blast at Ranger’s back pushing him down and surprising both Jimmy and Dr. Campbell. The dark-armored Prototype Mark III introduces himself to Jimmy as his replacement and states: Ultratech has somebody man enough to do what it takes!

With Bob Campbell beside him, Jimmy recalls that Prototype Mark III was one of the trainees that his boss Leland often flaunted in front of him. What Jimmy finds hard to believe is that one of the trainees was actually placed into an actual Prototype suit…

Quality

Once again, the creative team delivered the great stuff with storytelling, twists, spectacle and suspense all with a high level of quality. This comic book suggests that careful planning on plotting, characterization and intrigue were done by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski with a good amount of care and timing. As for what I mentioned earlier, I do confirm that the payoff for the corporate intrigue build-up has been realized big time and I should state that this comic book’s ending is very powerful (and also enticing for reading the next issue). This one is a smash hit!

This is only a few of the many action scenes that worked nicely with the in-depth story.

Conclusion

Prototype #12 is indeed great, worthy of serving as the anniversary issue (the two words stated on the cover) and as the climax of the first year of its series. For the most part, the series told events of not one but two Prototype pilots (the current one Jimmy Ruiz and the past one Bob Campbell) who eventually got together just as the series’ direction took a solid turn reflecting the changing interests of Ultratech. This one is definitely one of the best Ultraverse comics published in 1994 and it surely proved that the storytellers were not afraid to take risks or move against conventional storytelling (as far as armored superheroes go). Lastly, this comic book encouraged me to look back at issues #0 and #1.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #12 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $8.

Overall, Prototype #12 (1994) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #11 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey fellow superhero comic book geeks and Ultraverse fans! Welcome back to my continuing retrospective of the Ultraverse through the Prototype series of comic books published by Malibu Comics. Last time around, Jimmy Ruiz (Prototype) was not prominent as the comic book focused more on Ranger (the previous Prototype piloy Bob Campbell actually) who took on a group of terrorists with some help.

As such, we can see what happens next with this look back at Prototype #11, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski and art by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Glare, an old nemesis of Prototype. As it turns out, he was revived by some scientists in a high-tech facility of the sinister group Aladdin. The green-skinned Glare breaks free from the restraints and starts causing some damage. He is driven by revenge against Stanley Leland, Ultratech and Ranger (Bob Campbell).

Meanwhile on the street of New York, Jimmy Ruiz (Prototype) and Bob Campbell are together. Jimmy, who is not even using the powered suit of armor, released a lot of energy while floating off the surface causing a major public disturbance. Afterwards, Bob decides to help his Prototype successor…

Quality

Bob Campbel in his Ranger powered suit of armor.

Let me start by confirming that the storytelling is very good. In fact, the high quality of writing was maintained and judging from the presentation of having Jimmy Ruiz and Bob Campbell together in a full issue (note: they got together only in the late stages of issue #10), it seems that Tom Mason and Len Strazewski had things planned out in an organized fashion. The result is having the two Prototype pilots not only together but getting involved (in a pretty believable way) in response to a rising danger. To make things clearer, this is NOT the anticipated superheroes-set-aside-their-differences-to-work-together-to-solve-the-problem type of story.

Bob Campbell still got plenty of the spotlight as Ranger and his battle with Glare is a lot of fun to read. Jimmy Ruiz meanwhile is developed even further. I also like the scenes that emphasized the difference between being an ultra and a tool of Ultratech which affects Jimmy.

Conclusion

Jimmy Ruiz and Bob Campbell together.

Prototype #11 is another enjoyable and compelling Ultraverse comic book to read. Its own story is indeed special and worthy of being an Ultraverse 1st birthday issue (as marked on the cover). Clearly this comic book marked a bold new direction of storytelling just as the two Prototype pilots are finally together.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #11 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $8.

Overall, Prototype #11 (1994) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #10 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Without spoiling the story, the ending of Prototype #9 (1994) proved to be enticing for me to continue reading what happens next. As such, I went on to read the next issue.

Once again, we take another journey back into the Ultraverse in this look back at the comic book Prototype #10, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski, drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins at the top of the Statue of Liberty in New York where a police helicopter flies and its personnel see a few people hanged. Suddenly the head of the Statue of Liberty blew up which turned out to be the act of a terrorist group called Terrordyne. Terrorydyne’s leader Karl is determined to cause chaos and let the mainstream news media magnify their message of fear. By occupying the Statue of Liberty, the terrorists insists that it will down anything that violates their so-called airpace and territorial waters.

Meanwhile, news about Prototype’s (Jimmy Ruiz specifically) departure from Ultratech reaches previous Prototype pilot Bob Campbell. As a result, the city of New York does not have a full-time ultra of its own. Bob makes a move to take centerstage with his armor (Ranger).

Over at the headquarters of Ultratech, top executive Leland talks with Donovan, the new Prototype…

Quality

No surprise, the quality of the writing done by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason is pretty high but the big difference is that the spotlight was focused more on former Prototype pilot Bob Campbell (who was absent from the last issue) and the corporate sector with the terrorist act compelling them respectively.

While issue #9 was mostly about Jimmy Ruiz and his personal development while returning to his old community, this comic book brings back the spectacle (lots of action-packed scenes here) and the corporate intrigue big time! Bob Campbell is clearly the protagonist in this story and what he does here will make you interested to learn about his history as the previous Prototype pilot when he was still the one valuable employee of Ultratech.

While the story is enjoyable, I should say that terrorist leader Karl is pretty hollow as the villain and there is nothing interesting in him.

Bob Campbell as Ranger!

Conclusion

Do not let the nice cover fool you. Prototype #10 is an enjoyable read and the way its presentation was handled, it showed signs that careful planning was made by the creative team as the comic book (focused more on Bob Campbell and the corporations) served nicely as a companion piece to issue #9 which was more focused on Jimmy Ruiz.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #10 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $8 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $26.

Overall, Prototype #10 (1994) is recommended.

The terrorists.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #9 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey comic book fans and geeks! Do you enjoy reading comic books about armored superheroes that are not connected with Marvel’s Iron Man? The Ultraverse has an armored figure in Prototype but the big difference is that the said character is owned by a large corporation called Ultratech which in turns hired a young man named Jimmy Ruiz to pilot it. Oh yes, Jimmy Ruiz is actually the second person hired to pilot Prototype as his predecessor Bob Campbell was let go with one arm less.

Let’s revisit the Ultraverse by taking a look back at Prototype #9, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason with art done by Roger Robinson and Jeff Whiting.

The cover.

Early story

Set a short time after the hard battle between Prototype and Arena, the story begins in a secret facility somewhere in New York City where three armored figures engage in an intense session of flight, attacks and performance. The session is closely monitored by people watching from the observation deck. As it turns out, the session is actually a test for the three persons – two men and one lady – who applied to become the new Prototype which is the result of what happened at the end of issue #8.  Among the three, Donovan Jones was accepted as the new Prototype which Ultratech’s Stanley Leland confirms.

Over at Brooklyn, Jimmy Ruiz (Prototype) meets a lady from his past after paying respect to someone who was about to get buried. She tells him that since he left their old neighborhood, the local gangs have gotten worse. A short time later, the Prototype pilot meets an old gang he personally knows… 

Quality

Jimmy Ruiz and the gang from his past.

Let me start with the storytelling. This comic book is more about Jimmy Ruiz out on his own without the armor than it is about Ultratech and its high-tech interests. Bob Campbell’s not even in the story. That being said, this is pretty much a character-driven piece focused on Jimmy Ruiz as a person than as a hero and I should say that Tom Mason and Len Strazewski did a good job developing his character a lot. The writing is pretty lively and the writers pulled the right moves to define Jimmy Ruiz as a believable human being. There was that notable moment when after Jimmy returned to his old community and spends time with the old gang he personally knew, he realizes how much he has and how his perception changed. By the time you reach the end of the story, you’ll get to know Jimmy much better.

Conclusion

The money shot!

Prototype #9 is a character-driven comic book that succeeds in defining the personality and development of Jimmy Ruiz who is just one of two main characters in this series (which emphasized the struggles of two different persons involved with piloting Prototype). It lacks spectacle but that does not make this a boring comic book. Apart from Jimmy Ruiz, the corporate focus on Ultratech is short yet very intriguing.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #9 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $8.

Overall, Prototype #9 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #8 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! Are you ready for another return to the Ultraverse? This time, it’s a return to the Prototype monthly series published by Malibu Comics.

That being said, here is a look back at Prototype #8, published by Malibu Comics in 1994 with a story by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski, and art done by Roger Robinson.

Cover

Early story

The story begins with the continuing destructive battle between Prototype (piloted by Jimmy Ruiz) and Arena (a past foe that Bob Campbell dealt with as Prototype) inside a building in the middle of the city. As the two armored figures fight, an Ultratech executive calls out for Veil. Facing disadvantages against Arena, Prototype decides to fly out of the building to try something more strategic.

Meanwhile, Bomb Campbell learns about the ongoing battle in the news while working on a part of powered suit of armor he has. He notices the return of Arena and analyzes that Jimmy Ruiz will end up losing to the old foe…

Quality

5
Even flying away did not help Prototype from avoiding Arena’s attacks.

I’m happy to say that this is another well-written story here by Mason and Strazewski. While the battle between Arena and Prototype is the main feature, the script focused nicely on other developments such as Bob Campbell’s recollection of his past encounter with Arena (from his time as Prototype), how the city officials perceive ultras as a threat and danger to the locality, and how the people react to gang violence striking their community.

What is pretty striking with this comic book is the further development of Jimmy Ruiz as a character. Not only will you see him struggle a lot not only with fighting and piloting the powered sit of armor, you’ll also see how the frustration with his high-paying job impacts him deeply. His personality got fleshed out during his battle with Arena who in turn thinks with tradition and philosophies. The way the story ended is a must-see and the good news is that it builds up the suspense for the next issue.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #8 is fun to read and compelling for anyone who is focused on Jimmy Ruiz. This comic book, which by the way is loaded with lots of action, is not the typical hero-beats-antagonist type of story rather it went the extra mile on developing the present-day Prototype. It is also the most engaging portrayal of Jimmy Ruiz yet!

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #8 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #8 (1994) is recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #4 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

One of the things that I like most about the Prototype monthly series of the Ultraverse is that it follows the respective exploits of not one but two men who got involved as pilots of Ultratech’s powered suits of armors. Bob Campbell is the older Prototype pilot from the past who got succeeded by Jimmy Ruiz, a much younger guy doing the corporation’s wishes.

So far, the dual-narrative approach to storytelling worked well for me and it is one of the more defining elements of the Prototype series. We can find out more with this look back at Prototype #4, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski and drawn by David Ammerman.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins in New York City where Jimmy Ruiz looks down at the streets from the balcony of a tower. He remembered the old days when he used to live down there and spend time with his amigos. A pretty lady is on his bed with the blanket covering her naked body. After some talk, they make love with each other.

Over at the headquarters of Ultratech, a lady searches for Jimmy claiming she knows he’s living right there. The security guard tells her that Jimmy is not listed in the residential directory, and asked her to call the company in the morning. She leaves and passes by a man with a coat.

The coated guy approaches the security guard and asked for the name and contact number of their building manager. He claims to be look to sublet some office space….

Quality

15
Solidly fun action!

This is another well-written story by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski. In here, the new antagonist named Wrath was introduced and he certainly is not another generic bad guy opposite the superhero. During the heat of battle between him and Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz), you will learn nice details about Wrath through the banter. For one thing, Wrath works for a superior (like Prototype) and even though it is normal for him to use violence as a means of survival or winning, he makes it a point not to hurt civilians. The same conflict also paved the way for further development of the personality of Jimmy who is not only struggling with his job as Prototype pilot but also living with things that his employer physically implanted into his body that’s supposed to link him with the armor.

On the other hand, there is a short segment following former Prototype pilot Bob Campbell which served as a strong ending for the comic book. You really have to read it.

Conclusion

11
And the battle begins…

I really like this comic book. It’s got all the fun and compelling stuff any reader can enjoy. The introduction of Wrath alone is worth the cover price.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #4 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #4 (1993) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #7 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! Are you ready for another return to the Ultraverse following the tales of Prototype?

We can start now with this look back at Prototype #7, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski, and illustrated by Roger Robinson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins high above the city street with a battle between Prototype (piloted by Jimmy Ruiz using a more advanced armor provided by his boss) and Arena. The boss of Jimmy could only express surprise to see Arena return having believed that Bob Campbell finished him off some months back.

As the fight goes on, Arena realizes that it is not his old nemesis Bob Campbell occupying the Prototype armor. For his part, Jimmy struggles with the uncertainty that comes with fighting his predecessor’s nemesis from the past.

Meanwhile at the roof of Ultratech’s headquarters in the city, armed and armored personnel take position following the orders of Leland…

Quality

Once again, Tom Mason and Len Strazewski crafted another strongly engaging story with the established mix of spectacle, corporate intrigue and the continued development of the two pilots of Prototype – Jimmy and Bob.

Speaking of the two, I love the way the story explored the other key elements from the respective personal lives of Jimmy and Bob. While Bob tends to his friend Jake in the hospital, Jimmy’s girl continues to pursue him (Jimmy) even though he is occupied with working as Prototype. This comic book also went the extra mile confirming the shared universe connection with a certain other Ultraverse character (note: he had his own series) making an appearance.

Artist Roger Robinson continued to deliver nice visuals that reflected the script, from the subtle drama scenes to the dynamic action scenes.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #7 is another solidly enjoyable comic book of the Ultraverse, worthy of inclusion in your collection.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #7 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $13.

Overall, Prototype #7 is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #6 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Wrapping up the details after the end of a major crossover is undoubtedly challenging for any comic book creator. Doing such aftermath work includes settling the interaction between characters from different comic book series, explaining the details behind what happened, how the event itself affected the rest of the comic book universe and more. The crossover I’m referring to her specifically is Break-Thru, the memorable year-ender story of the Ultraverse.

This time, we will see the post-Break-Thru side through the armored hero of the Ultraverse in this look back at Prototype #6, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story co-written by Len Strazewski and Tom Mason, and drawn by Roger Robinson.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins just hours after the ultras of Earth fought the epic battle on the moon. Prototype and Prime fly their way back to Earth, with the latter serving as a makeshift shield from the heat of re-entry. By this time, the two ultras just concluded their meeting with the Strangers back on the moon, and it was there the idea of trailing Prime was discussed. For Prototype, doing this was crazy especially since it was only days since he fought Prime back on Earth.

Along the way, Prototype (pilot by Jimmy Ruiz specifically) intends to talk with Stanley Leland whom he believes set him up and almost got him killed with the mission to the moon…

Quality

4
After Prototype and Prime parted ways with the Strangers…

This comic book’s story is compelling. Not only does it wrap up the details of Break-Thru through the viewpoint of Prototype, it excelled with telling the story of Bob Campbell (the original Prototype pilot). As the build-up for Bob has been established in the previous issues, his story here resulted a nice pay-off and most notably, it raises the stakes when it comes to the narrative of the Prototype series (which consistently told parallel stories of Jimmy and Bob). I also enjoyed the introduction of a new villainess as well as the continued portrayal of corporate intrigue (this alone is one of the best features of the Ultraverse narrative).

The visuals done by Roger Robinson are pretty good and they really brought the script to life. Robinson also scored well with making the action scenes look dynamic without going over the top.

Conclusion

2
The money shot!

Prototype #6 is a great read! Not only does it wrap up the Break-Thru crossover through Prototype, it also has solid storytelling turning points not only with Bob Campbell but also Jimmy Ruiz. There were no boring scenes and I love the way the script emphasized the culture of corporate America within the Ultraverse and how it affects ultras.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #6 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #6 (1994) is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #3 (1993)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Are you geeks and comic readers ready for another trip back to the good old days in the 1990s when the Ultraverse line of comic books was published by Malibu Comics in competition with the superhero offerings of Marvel, DC and Valiant Comics?

Here is a look back at Prototype #3, published in 1993 by Malibu Comics with a story by Tom Mason, Len Strazewski and drawn by David Ammerman.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Jimmy Ruiz (current Prototype user) in a private jet with his corporate companion Hastings. He’s feeling restless over the delay at the airport.

On a large commercial airplane, a gang of armed, masked men suddenly enter stating they claim the plane in the name of Terrordyne, Inc. Passengers naturally got frightened.

From a distance, Jimmy noticed the trouble happening and told Hastings to call security.

Meanwhile in Chicago, an armed lady talks to someone over the phone. In New York, men start to do some work on the body of Glare, a huge green-skinned figure. He is being prepared for Aladdin…

Quality

11
The money shot of this comic book.

Unsurprisingly, stories of heroic struggles (told through Jim and Bob respectively), corporate intrigue and fighting the bad (in this issue: new villain Heater) were the most defining elements of this comic book. The good news here is that there is still a cohesive story told by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski. One of the more notable parts of the story was Bob Campbell’s reuniting with Felicia which for me made a lot of sense since I already read Prototype #0. Once again, David Ammerman did a good job visualizing the script.

Conclusion

5
Glare in the possession of a group.

Prototype #3 is another fun read that has a careful mix of spectacle, character development and corporate culture exposition. While it does not have the horror element of issue #2, its focus on the corporate side and secret operations made this comic book deep. At the same time, this comic book solidly established Jimmy and Bob as the protagonists of the series.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #3 (1993), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $4. The near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $13.

Overall, Prototype #3 (1993) is recommended.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com