A Look Back at Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Like any geek, I still love watching Terminator 2: Judgment Day, specifically its extended version which was James Cameron’s true vision. I’m not exactly a fan of Arnold Schwarzenegger, but I really love his work in T2 as well as in Total Recall. When it comes to James Cameron’s works, I personally prefer T2 over Avatar, Titanic and True Lies.

As for the Terminator franchise itself, it spawned cinematic sequels that only turned up as disappointments. Terminator 2 was indeed the high point of the film franchise and everything really went downhill afterwards. I should state that Terminator: Dark Fate should be avoided as it is not worth your time and money.

Recently, I searched for some comic books that served as sequels to Terminator 2 and I found one from the mid-1990s and it is a direct follow-up! We can find out more in this look back at Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1, published in 1995 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Dan Abnett and Rod Whigham.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins immediately after the end of Terminator 2 with the injured Sarah Connor (with a very exhausted John Connor sleeping) still managing to drive the car in the middle of the night. As she drives, Sarah recalled that she never asked for the responsibility of preserving mankind as it was forced on her way back in 1984. She also recalled the time in Tech Noir when the Terminator almost killed her as she got saved by Kyle Reese.

By morning, Sarah and John reached the desert and returned to the lonely home of her old ally Enrique. Suddenly a man with a shotgun comes out and aims his weapon directly at Sarah. Carrying a gun, John comes out to help his mother…

Quality

John and Sarah Connor.

Let me start with the story and make clear to you readers that this comic book easily defies the conclusion that was set in the movie Terminator 2. If you have seen the film, you should be aware that the way it was concluded made sure there is no more future war and no more Terminators. Like the 2003 movie Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, this comic book just kept on pushing the concept that Judgement Day and the war with the machines are still inevitable and that Terminators from the future would only continue to arrive to hunt and kill John. As such, the hard struggle for Sarah and her son continues.

That being said, this comic book really pushed hard with its sequel approach. Remember what happened in the steel mill in Terminator 2? Several personnel investigated the facility and one particular detective arrived searching for Sarah Connor who has been labeled as an escapee from the state hospital. Inside the steel mill is the severed left arm of the Terminator (which got stuck to crushing mechanical wheels as seen in the 1991 movie) which is the storytelling key the comic book creators used to justify this sequel.  

To the comic creators’ credit, they did their research about T2 and even made references to other characters of that movie. As a result, this comic book appears loaded with fan service.

Even though it has many references and connections to the 1991 movie, this comic book also has some completely new stuff to expand on T2’s concept. The destruction of Cyberdyne’s facility in the movie resulted an emergency meeting of a corporation’s board of directors (and a certain senator) which creatively sets up further conflicts as well as struggles for Sarah and her son.

In terms of writing, this comic book’s story is cohesive enough. As for the art, the quality is fine and most notably, the illustrator managed to somewhat capture the likeness of Linda Hamilton on Sarah Connor.

Conclusion

The severed Terminator arm as the single factor that justified this sequel somewhat.

I can say that Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995) is a surprisingly satisfying read mainly due to its writing and artistic quality. While its push to justify a sequel barely succeeds, there is more good stuff than negative ones overall. As far as making sequels to Terminator 2 is concerned, this one is somewhat more believable than the 2003 movie.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $19.

Overall, Terminator 2: Cybernetic Dawn #1 (1995) is satisfactory.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #4 (1992)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey fellow geeks and comic book collectors plus the fans of RoboCop and Terminator! This is it! I have finally reached the end of the 4-issue RoboCop versus The Terminator mini-series of comic books spearheaded by Frank Miller.

To give a recap without spoiling plot details, issue #1 was mainly a build-up issue which did not entertain on its own. In issue #2, there was a huge pay-off to the build-up and seeing RoboCop battle the Terminator was a grand spectacle! Issue #3 meanwhile saw some very daring creative twists taken that further mixed elements of the respective Terminator and RoboCop universes together which ultimately served as a build-up for what could be a potential epic in the comic book featured in this review.

Is the build-up worth it? Did the issue #3 twists pave the way for something memorable? We will all find out in this look back at RoboCop versus The Terminator 4, published in 1992 by Dark Horse Comics with a story written by Frank Miller and drawn by Walt Simonson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins again in the dark future when the world is ravage by the war between man and machines. As the human resistance falters, the machines of Skynet march further toward their prey. Suddenly, RoboCop flies in and hits them with a very powerful rocket.

Inside a cybernetic hideout, a familiar short-haired lady gets shaken by the blast. As a result, she will not go back in time and will no longer try to kill RoboCop. On the monitors, she watches the armed cyborg cop destroy Skynet’s troops and saved the human resistance from certain death.

Shortly after, the human warriors take a much-needed rest. Feeling restless, the lady warrior approaches RoboCop privately and states that she figured he is not a Terminator. RoboCop, whose helmet was taken off showing his human face as officer Murphy, pets a dog as the lady approaches them.

It turns out the lady’s name is Flo (short for Florence) and she starts conversing with him peacefully. She then starts trusting RoboCop, even resting by his side. RoboCop, however, knows what has been going on that the humans don’t and he knows that Skynet and its army of Terminators acknowledge him as their creator. How his decision to help the human resistance in the war against the machines will turn out remains to be seen.

Quality

Another twist, another scenario for the war between man and machines.

When it comes to its story, Frank Miller really exerted efforts to give this comic book’s final conflict an epic presentation which is no surprise since the stakes were already raised as a result of the big twists in issue #3. Epic concept aside, the concept of RoboCop helping the humans fight Skynet is indeed awesome and daring to see. There is one additional idea Miller came up with which raise the stakes even further in the war, and what that idea was about is something you readers should find out on your own by getting a copy of this comic book.

If there are any weaknesses here, it’s the presentation of the concept of time travel and time distortion which, even in this concluding part of the mini-series, remains used to justify scenario twists. As a result, the ending of this comic book made the whole conflict look and feel like a twisted, wild dream. Another thing to point out was that Skynet, even in its cybernetic form, was portrayed with human-like patterns and even tried to reason with RoboCop. This one weakened the Terminator concept a bit. Still, the series ended with enough satisfaction for me.

Conclusion

RoboCop and the human resistance.

RoboCop versus The Terminator #4 is worthy conclusion to its mini-series. On its own, it had an epic concept and the creators really did what they could to raise the stakes of the conflict as well as raising the quality of their presentation. When it comes to combining the creative elements of the Terminator and RoboCop franchises, Miller did a solid job. It’s just that time travel and time distortion were used to create new scenarios once again in this particular comic book which I found unnecessary. On the bright side, this comic book is loaded with lots of action scenes and the quality of the dialogue was improved.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of RoboCop versus The Terminator #4 (1992), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of this comic book costs $10.

Overall, RoboCop versus The Terminator #4 (1992) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #3 (1992)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey everyone! It’s time to go back to the comic book crossover featuring two metallic titans, The Terminator and RoboCop! I have already reviewed two issues of the 4-issue mini-series published by Dark Horse Comics and so far, it’s been a mixed ride. Issue #1 was pretty much a huge build-up that led to a nice pay-off in issue #2. Considering what happened at the end of the last issue, I got hooked with wanting to see what follows next.

As such, here is my look back at RoboCop versus The Terminator #3, published in 1992 by Dark Horse Comics with a story written by Frank Miller and drawn by Walt Simonson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins in the far future in with planet Earth already saved but at the expense of humanity. The human race not only got crushed but also flattened, processed and converted into energy to fuel the Terminators. While things look certain and final for machines and man in the far future, a universe is about to organize.

Back in the present day, RoboCop just defeated the Terminator in a high-octane battle that caused a whole lot of damage. The lady from the far future asked RoboCop if he understood what has happened and if he finally believes she told the truth. Realizing the truth, RoboCop allows her to come close and try to blast him with her huge weapon. The attempt failed and RoboCop walks away.

RoboCop visits the cemetery and spends time at his grave that states his name: Alex Murphy. After some deep reflection, RoboCop recalls his vision of the far future. This prompts him to take the most drastic action he could think of…

Quality

Something suspenseful…

Considering how the story turned out in the first two issues, it was no surprise that some drastic twists had to be taken to not only continue the combined universes of RoboCop and the Terminator, but also keep things fresh. The good news here is that Frank Miller’s writing is pretty good and he successfully kept the story cohesive even though drastic twists were made.

At the very core of the story is the theme about RoboCop being acknowledged as the creator of Skynet and the Terminators. As a police officer, RoboCop’s duty is to protect the innocent and uphold the law for the good of his local society, and yet for as long as he exists, so will Skynet and the Terminators of the far future. How Frank Miller fused key elements of RoboCop’s mythos with those of the Terminator franchise was pretty clever and believable from a fantasy viewpoint.

When it comes to weak points, I should say that Walt Simonson’s are here is not great although he does a descent job with drawing RoboCop. Simonson’s visual take on the Terminators has that cartoony look which is alienating.

Conclusion

It sure is hard to make the moves to drastically alter the future for the good of humanity.

RoboCop versus The Terminator #3 is a successfully told chapter in its 4-issue mini-series. It falls short of the greatness of issue #2 but it still proved to be fun and compelling to read. By the time the comic book ended, the stakes were raised for the next issue which I look forward to read.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of RoboCop versus The Terminator #3 (1992), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy costs $15.

Overall, RoboCop versus The Terminator #3 (1992) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com