A Look Back at Prototype #16 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

As many of you know by now, I’ve reviewed lots of Ultraverse comic books and that includes a whole lot of issues of Prototype. In recent times, I reviewed the Hostile Takeover storyline that involved not only Prototype but also The Solution, Night Man and even Solitaire. To put things in order, my previous review of Prototype was issue #15 which took place after Hostile Takeover ended. What I enjoyed about it so much is that even though Jimmy Ruiz still has the powered suit of armor with him, his life has changed drastically and he no longer has the high salary and big-time perks that he had from his previous employer.

What will happen next to him? We can all find out in this look back at Prototype #16, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins right in the middle of a battle on a city street between Prototype against a large armored enemy (that intends to kill him) piloted by a man named Donovan Jones. This was supposed to be the night of Jimmy Ruiz getting engaged with Angella.

As his intensity grows, Prototype fires a powerful blast against Jones causing his armored suit to fall back hard and get damaged heavily. Jones finds himself exposed and Angella only hopes that Prototype does not kill him. Jones surprises him by showing his armor magnetically reassembles itself and makes him even more powerful…

Quality

The is one nice shot!

When it comes to plot, this comic book is more about the continuing battle between Jimmy and Donovan Jones. It really pushed aside the development of Jimmy’s new life which is not necessarily a problem as it paved the way for a lot more spectacle for readers to enjoy by means of two armored figures fighting each other hard while trying to outsmart each other. This one has a lot action scenes as well as energy blasts. What I find intriguing and creative here is how Donovan Jones was presented to be a walking, healing factor with improving his physical shell dramatically.

Although filled with spectacle, Len Strazewski still saved some space for character development and exposition. Without spoiling it, I can say that a certain flashback that got dramatized through Angella’s recall of the past adds a new layer into the life of Jimmy Ruiz. It was short but still worthy to read.

As far as Jimmy’s new life goes, the big battle of this comic book is itself a reflection of the impact that the Hostile Takeover storyline had on him. There is not too much corporate intrigue in this story, but the effects of the mentioned crossover storyline can still be felt.

Conclusion

This comic book has a lot of robot-inspired action.

I can say that Prototype #16 (1994) is another good Ultraverse comic book to read. In fact, you will relate with its plot and spectacle a lot more if you managed to read the entire Hostile Takeover storyline. Otherwise, it should be able to satisfy you.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #16 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $27.

Overall, Prototype #16 (1994) is recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of Malibu Comics! Today we revisit the Ultraverse through the 4th and concluding chapter of the Hostile Takeover crossover storyline which involved the UV’s notable heroes like Prototype, The Solution, Night Man and even Solitaire. To put things in perspective, the first three chapters were told in The Night Man #12, Solitaire #10 and The Solution #13.

At this point in Hostile Takeover, the stakes were raised and things have turned messy not only for the UV heroes but also for the corporate figures involved. To see if everything will truly be resolved, join me in this look back at Giant Size Prototype #1, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with TV newscasts about the tremendous collapse of UltraTech as a result of corporate in-fighting which rocked Wall Street. A New York Stock Exchange analyst states on TV: Either the market insiders are completely confused about the future of UltraTech and are speculating wildly or UltraTech is right in the middle of one of the most violent hostile takeovers in corporate history!

Moments back, Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz) and Teknight battled each other while The Solution found Ranger blocking their way.

Inside the corporate headquarters, Gordon Bell could not control himself in the presence of Felicia, Jimmy and Bob Campbell. With the helicopter carrying Teknight arriving at the roof top and The Solution (with Night Man) making their way through the basement, Gordon Bell sends Prototype and Ranger to secure the place, leaving Felicia behind.  

Quality

Prototype and Teknight crash into the office of Gordon Bell with The Solution and Night Man as witnesses.

As expected, corporate intrigue remains as the core concept or theme of this extensive (over 30 pages in story) comic book. Without spoiling the plot, I can say that the turmoil of UltraTech is a true turning point within the Ultraverse and its effects were really felt in my recent Prototype retro comic book review. This story also sheds light on the UV’s corporate figures J.D. Hunt and Stanley Leland and it was here where their influence is really felt.

As for the Ultraverse heroes, this story unsurprisingly shows more of what Prototype and Ranger went through in their respective participation of the events and incidents that happened throughout Hostile Takeover (which were also dramatized in smaller parts in the other comic books of this crossover storyline). There is more depth in the encounter between Prototype and Teknight, and in Ranger’s encounter with The Solution and Night Man. The good thing here is that the mentioned encounters are very well written and filled with solid dialogue by Len Strazewski, resulting more engagement between the reader and Prototype and Ranger.

As to how the Hostile Takeover storyline concluded, I would obviously not spoil it here but I can assure you all that it ended with a huge impact and some powerful images.

Conclusion

Prototype, Ranger and Felicia with Gordon Bell.

Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994) served its purpose in concluding the Hostile Takeover storyline and its best feature is its writing. It also served as a definitive turning point in the story of the titular character. As a whole, Hostile Takeover’s concept is really short and the approach to showing readers the moments of the events as seen through the eyes of different Ultraverse characters is flawed (note: this is not your typical straightforward crossover storytelling) and relied on padding to fill the narrative. In addition, there is one standalone short story that should please fans of Bob Campbell as Ranger.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #15 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of Malibu Comics! Today, I’ve decided to take a break from the Hostile Takeover storyline of the Ultraverse and focus more on the Prototype monthly series. Last time around, a new chapter in the life of Prototype pilot Jimmy Ruiz started and in the corporate world, he took a job that paid so much less than before.

What exactly will happen to Jimmy? We can all find out in this look back at Prototype #15, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Dean Zachary.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside a top-secret facility somewhere in the city of New York. A black man is going through the painful processes of cybernetic enhancements. His name is Donovan Jones and he is told by a shadowy figure that he is a failure and only their organization can turn him into something else…more than a human loser.

“You always were an ultra, Jones…and UltraTech knew this! But they never revealed this toyou,” said the shadowy figure.

Donovan Jones expresses his hatred for UltraTech. He also expresses his intention to destroy Prototype.

Elsewhere, a long vehicular bridge has been damaged. Helping the victims were Ranger (Bob Campbell) and Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz) trying to ensure that they could balance the bridge to prevent cars from falling over the edge. They managed to solve the problem paving the way for things to go back to normal. The affected people express their thanks and admiration to them.

As they fly away together, Bob and Jimmy talk about matters related to being ultra heroes. A short time later, Jimmy takes the train going to New Jersey as a civilian. He arrives at the facility of Direct Contact which is a division of NuWare. It turns out this is his first day of work with them and he is still struggling with the drastic changes now that his huge perks and privileges with UltraTech are no more…  

Quality

Jimmy Ruiz in a tough situation in front with his new boss on his first day at work.

I really like the story and the way Jimmy Ruiz was portrayed. This is really fine writing by Len Strazewski and it seems he organized a plan to not only redefine the protagonist but also change the status quo around him. I liked the way Strazewski set up the first-day-on-the-job struggles of Jimmy which really showed how fragile he is as a person without the armored suit to help him. His boss really was hard on him and made things a bit complicated for him as far as the use of Prototype is concerned under the control of NuWare. I also like the way Jimmy was portrayed in trying to be very responsible about his domestic life and the future ahead of him and his pregnant darling Angella.

Apart from the in-depth characterization, there is a good amount of superhero action to keep fans satisfied. The action was nicely drawn by Dean Zachary.

Conclusion

Prototype and Ranger.

Prototype #15 (1994) is a lot of fun and pretty engaging. In fact, this comic book is a nice pay-off following the build-up that was done in issue #14. To see Jimmy Ruiz redefined as a person without the armor is compelling and the story was nicely structured by Len Strazewski. For serious Prototype fans, this is one comic book that is worth reading again and again. Lastly, this one has a very intriguing ending that you have to read and find out.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #15 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, Prototype #15 (1994) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #14 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of the Malibu Comics! It’s been months since the last time I reviewed a comic book of Prototype. For me Prototype is one of the more defining characters of the entire Ultraverse and I really enjoyed reading each issue of the monthly series (which started in 1993 along with many other UV titles). Prototype is not a mere imitation of Marvel Comics’ Iron Man. In fact, the armored character has a lot more depth and the overall concept of the Prototype monthly series involves corporate intrigue.

Now we can see more of the armored ultra in this look back at Prototype #14, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside a high-tech facility. An executive enters a room and approaches a powerful, technology enhanced being called Manhattan Project. He tells him to do his duty. In response, Manhattan Project (note: he appeared in Prime #18) grabs the executive by the throat and kills him.

Elsewhere, chaos strikes the city as the armored Gordon Bell unleashes his fury which Prototype, Ranger, Night Man and The Solution witnessed. Bell pointed at Prototype promising he will come back for him.

Some time later, Jimmy Ruiz (Prototype) visits and meets Lisa Lopez, the director of human resources. At this point, the destruction of Gordon Bell’s own office as well as the recent corporate merger put Jimmy in a bind with uncertainty. To his dismay, the job offered to him pays less than half of what he was making due to technical evaluations related to the merger. Even so, he decides to accept the new job…

Quality

The money shot!

This is an enjoyable, character-driven story of Prototype. It is a refreshing way of presenting the title character after having read lots of Prototype comic books that had the spotlight divided between Jimmy Ruiz and Bob Campbell. The corporate intrigue continues nicely in this story but the stakes have been raised not only with NuWare and Ultratech, but also with Jimmy Ruiz.

The Prototype pilot finds himself in a new stage of his life, one that is full of uncertainty and pain as his high-paying job is no more and a lot of secret technology records got destroyed. Apart from a destroyed career, Jimmy also has to struggle with the power surging in him which requires him to use the Prototype armor to reduce the extra power.

Prototype encounters Manhattan Project in this issue and I can say that it was not only action-packed but also had a nice combination of intensity and emotions. The said encounter was short but every moment of it was very enjoyable to read.

Conclusion

Major career challenge for Jimmy Ruiz.

Prototype #14 (1994) is a lot of fun to read and anyone who is true follower to Jimmy Ruiz will be happy to that there is very strong focus on him. It seems that this story marks the turning point of his life and sets the stage for more surprises and intrigue as the corporate world turned upside down.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #14 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, Prototype #14 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #0

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

If you are looking for a great origin story set within the Ultraverse, you can’t go wrong with Prototype #0. Before we explore the said comic book, let me remind you that during my review of Prototype #1, I stated that it was great and it had a nice balance between spectacle, storytelling and characterization. There were also references to some threads to the past with regards to Bob Campbell (the original Prototype pilot) who could not help but witness his replacement Jimmy Ruiz have the spotlight being the new Prototype.

That being said, we can take a trip to the events that happened in the past with this look back at Prototype #0, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski with illustrations done by Gordon Purcell and Keith Conroy.

Cover
The cover.

Early story

The story begins some time in the past with an interview with top executive Stanley Leland who recalls how Bob Campbell got involved with his corporation Ultratech. As it turned out, Campbell was working in Hollywood as a stunt performer in science fiction films. Campbell fit in nicely with Hollywood job having previously served as a member of the United States Army’s special forces and has been experienced with tactical weapons and hand-to-hand combat.

The advertising agency of Leland’s company hired Campbell to wear a multipurpose exoskeleton prototype armor for the filming of a promotional project meant for the military. Campbell used what turned out to be the original Prototype armor which was very bulky and had a dome-style metallic head (that reminds of Marvel’s Mysterio). Even though it was bulky, the armor was still loaded with weapons and enhanced the pilot’s physical strength by twenty times complete with artificial intelligence (AI) assisting with the operation.

21
Taking care of Bob Campbell, the original Prototype pilot.

Even though there was a hitch (something went offline) during the filming, Bob Campbell still managed to make great use of the armor and delivered results so spectacular, Leland hired him with a high-paying contract to work officially as Prototype.

Ultratech benefited nicely in terms of sales with Prototype as their key figure and Campbell had that Rambo style which impressed the military. Shortly after, the success started entering Campbell’s head resulting more costs for Ultratech…

Quality

7
The original Prototype saved a pretty lady!

This is one great and very cleverly crafted superhero origin story! When it comes to the presentation, the exploration of past events by means of recollections and memories of different people interviewed is excellent! Having worked before as a reporter for a local community newspaper, I myself interviewed a lot of people to dig for information about the past and as such, this comic book’s approach is something I personally strongly relate with.

Through the words of Leland, Campbell’s ex-wife, Marjorie Fredericks and Hastings the caretaker, the details of what happened with Bob Campbell as the original Prototype are clearly defined. The same goes with the nature of Ultratech as a corporation and owner/developer of the powered suits of armor, not to mention how they affect the public’s perception and how they treat their employees. The last chapter focused on Jimmy Ruiz and how he became the present-day Prototype was handled in a more conventional way.

Along the way, the dialogue is very well written and the characters are nicely defined which is no surprise considering the combined high talents of Tom Mason and Len Strazewski. The art provided Gordon Purcelli and Keith Conroy is very good. Apart from the in-depth writing, the dynamic action and strong visuals, I should say that this comic book is a lot of fun to read and it perfect connects with issue #1.

Conclusion

5
Bob Campbell hired full-time as Prototype pilot.

Prototype #0 is undoubtedly a great comic book to read and easily one of the very best Ultraverse stories I read (apart from being one of the best superhero origin stories of the UV) so far. I was really engaged from start to finish, and I should state that Bob Campbell’s importance is real even as he became the has-been character in the later Prototype issues. This comic book successfully achieved its purpose on telling the origin of Prototype and made sense out of what Roland Mann said: the race has only just started!

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #0, be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $4.

Overall, Prototype #0 is highly recommended!


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back At Prototype #1

There is nothing like witnessing a superhero use technology to fly around with high speed, blast with energy, lift heavy objects using extra strength and use whatever special features to beat the bad guys and save people from harm. I’m not talking about Marvel Comics’ Iron Man here. I’m talking about the Ultraverse parallel to him called Prototype and here is my retrospective review about the 1993 superhero comic book Prototype #1 published by Malibu Comics.

Proto1
Prototype #1 cover.

Co-written by Tom Mason and Len Strazewski with art by David Ammerman and James Pascoe, Prototype #1 is the story of the armored figure called Prototype but there is one huge thing to take note here – the armored figure is actually a high-tech project of a corporation called Ultratech and it involves more than one person piloting it.

To put things in perspective, some time in the past the Prototype armor (which was very large and bulky) was piloted by Bob Campbell until a major incident happened during an aerial exhibition that cost him his right arm. Subsequently he got replaced by a much younger man named Jimmy Ruiz. In the present, Campbell is a PWD (person with disability) who was dismissed by the company which compelled him to sue them for age discrimination.

Then he attends the stockholders’ meeting of Ultratech which was organized to be lavish and showy. It is here where Prototype (piloted by Ruiz) makes an energetic appearance sporting a leaner looking armor that closely resembles a human being.

Ruiz says “Stand back, America…it’s showtime!”

Proto2
The leaner and meaner armor of Prototype.

While showing off, Ruiz encounters some problems. He has not fully gotten used to the technology and his head feels like exploding. During the stockholders’ meeting, Bob Campbell causes some trouble prompting private security to escort him away. It turns out that Ultratech really distanced themselves from him.

Of course, the company is very happy with the Ruiz-piloted Prototype and they are confident their major financial bets will yield great results. Their executive Stanley Leland stated, “He’s not just a showpiece, he’s a corporate asset!”

Proto4
Jimmy Ruiz in the Prototype suit with the Ultratech executives.

As this is a superhero story, life is not normal. As such an incident happens that, predictably, requires Prototype to take action (and entertain readers like you and I).

Technically the story was nicely told and its pacing flowed smoothly. There is a nice balance between spectacle, storytelling and character development. Ultimately by the time I reached the 24th page, I got a grasp of the comic book’s concept, the characters (especially the two pilots) and where the series was going.

Proto3
Action for you. Really nice job done by the artists.

How does this comic book compare with Iron Man? To say the least, the concept of a large corporation owning and controlling a high-tech suit of armor piloted by their employee is not only a nice alternative but a very engaging alternative to the Iron Man concept (super rich industrialist who wears a powered suit of armor and uses his special talent on technology).

The Ultraverse was the most interesting and most entertaining superhero line of comic books I read back in the 1990s and Prototype went on to become one of the major heroes of the franchise. Prototype went on to become part of UltraForce, a superhero team that had its short-lived comic book series (with famous artist George Perez doing the art in some issues) as well as a short-lived animated series based on the said comic book series.

Had the Ultraverse lasted longer, succeeded and profited, chances are Prototype would have been a major contender among all other superheroes from the different publishers  today and there would have been more merchandise and perhaps even video games based on the character.

If you plan to visit a local comic book store to buy old comic books, I highly recommend Prototype #1.


Thank you for reading. If you find this article to be engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. Also my fantasy book The World of Havenor is still available in paperback and e-book format. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco.