A Look Back at Prototype #16 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

As many of you know by now, I’ve reviewed lots of Ultraverse comic books and that includes a whole lot of issues of Prototype. In recent times, I reviewed the Hostile Takeover storyline that involved not only Prototype but also The Solution, Night Man and even Solitaire. To put things in order, my previous review of Prototype was issue #15 which took place after Hostile Takeover ended. What I enjoyed about it so much is that even though Jimmy Ruiz still has the powered suit of armor with him, his life has changed drastically and he no longer has the high salary and big-time perks that he had from his previous employer.

What will happen next to him? We can all find out in this look back at Prototype #16, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins right in the middle of a battle on a city street between Prototype against a large armored enemy (that intends to kill him) piloted by a man named Donovan Jones. This was supposed to be the night of Jimmy Ruiz getting engaged with Angella.

As his intensity grows, Prototype fires a powerful blast against Jones causing his armored suit to fall back hard and get damaged heavily. Jones finds himself exposed and Angella only hopes that Prototype does not kill him. Jones surprises him by showing his armor magnetically reassembles itself and makes him even more powerful…

Quality

The is one nice shot!

When it comes to plot, this comic book is more about the continuing battle between Jimmy and Donovan Jones. It really pushed aside the development of Jimmy’s new life which is not necessarily a problem as it paved the way for a lot more spectacle for readers to enjoy by means of two armored figures fighting each other hard while trying to outsmart each other. This one has a lot action scenes as well as energy blasts. What I find intriguing and creative here is how Donovan Jones was presented to be a walking, healing factor with improving his physical shell dramatically.

Although filled with spectacle, Len Strazewski still saved some space for character development and exposition. Without spoiling it, I can say that a certain flashback that got dramatized through Angella’s recall of the past adds a new layer into the life of Jimmy Ruiz. It was short but still worthy to read.

As far as Jimmy’s new life goes, the big battle of this comic book is itself a reflection of the impact that the Hostile Takeover storyline had on him. There is not too much corporate intrigue in this story, but the effects of the mentioned crossover storyline can still be felt.

Conclusion

This comic book has a lot of robot-inspired action.

I can say that Prototype #16 (1994) is another good Ultraverse comic book to read. In fact, you will relate with its plot and spectacle a lot more if you managed to read the entire Hostile Takeover storyline. Otherwise, it should be able to satisfy you.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #16 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $27.

Overall, Prototype #16 (1994) is recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of Malibu Comics! Today we revisit the Ultraverse through the 4th and concluding chapter of the Hostile Takeover crossover storyline which involved the UV’s notable heroes like Prototype, The Solution, Night Man and even Solitaire. To put things in perspective, the first three chapters were told in The Night Man #12, Solitaire #10 and The Solution #13.

At this point in Hostile Takeover, the stakes were raised and things have turned messy not only for the UV heroes but also for the corporate figures involved. To see if everything will truly be resolved, join me in this look back at Giant Size Prototype #1, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Roger Robinson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with TV newscasts about the tremendous collapse of UltraTech as a result of corporate in-fighting which rocked Wall Street. A New York Stock Exchange analyst states on TV: Either the market insiders are completely confused about the future of UltraTech and are speculating wildly or UltraTech is right in the middle of one of the most violent hostile takeovers in corporate history!

Moments back, Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz) and Teknight battled each other while The Solution found Ranger blocking their way.

Inside the corporate headquarters, Gordon Bell could not control himself in the presence of Felicia, Jimmy and Bob Campbell. With the helicopter carrying Teknight arriving at the roof top and The Solution (with Night Man) making their way through the basement, Gordon Bell sends Prototype and Ranger to secure the place, leaving Felicia behind.  

Quality

Prototype and Teknight crash into the office of Gordon Bell with The Solution and Night Man as witnesses.

As expected, corporate intrigue remains as the core concept or theme of this extensive (over 30 pages in story) comic book. Without spoiling the plot, I can say that the turmoil of UltraTech is a true turning point within the Ultraverse and its effects were really felt in my recent Prototype retro comic book review. This story also sheds light on the UV’s corporate figures J.D. Hunt and Stanley Leland and it was here where their influence is really felt.

As for the Ultraverse heroes, this story unsurprisingly shows more of what Prototype and Ranger went through in their respective participation of the events and incidents that happened throughout Hostile Takeover (which were also dramatized in smaller parts in the other comic books of this crossover storyline). There is more depth in the encounter between Prototype and Teknight, and in Ranger’s encounter with The Solution and Night Man. The good thing here is that the mentioned encounters are very well written and filled with solid dialogue by Len Strazewski, resulting more engagement between the reader and Prototype and Ranger.

As to how the Hostile Takeover storyline concluded, I would obviously not spoil it here but I can assure you all that it ended with a huge impact and some powerful images.

Conclusion

Prototype, Ranger and Felicia with Gordon Bell.

Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994) served its purpose in concluding the Hostile Takeover storyline and its best feature is its writing. It also served as a definitive turning point in the story of the titular character. As a whole, Hostile Takeover’s concept is really short and the approach to showing readers the moments of the events as seen through the eyes of different Ultraverse characters is flawed (note: this is not your typical straightforward crossover storytelling) and relied on padding to fill the narrative. In addition, there is one standalone short story that should please fans of Bob Campbell as Ranger.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, Giant Size Prototype #1 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Prototype #15 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of Malibu Comics! Today, I’ve decided to take a break from the Hostile Takeover storyline of the Ultraverse and focus more on the Prototype monthly series. Last time around, a new chapter in the life of Prototype pilot Jimmy Ruiz started and in the corporate world, he took a job that paid so much less than before.

What exactly will happen to Jimmy? We can all find out in this look back at Prototype #15, published in 1994 by Malibu Comics with a story written by Len Strazewski and drawn by Dean Zachary.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins inside a top-secret facility somewhere in the city of New York. A black man is going through the painful processes of cybernetic enhancements. His name is Donovan Jones and he is told by a shadowy figure that he is a failure and only their organization can turn him into something else…more than a human loser.

“You always were an ultra, Jones…and UltraTech knew this! But they never revealed this toyou,” said the shadowy figure.

Donovan Jones expresses his hatred for UltraTech. He also expresses his intention to destroy Prototype.

Elsewhere, a long vehicular bridge has been damaged. Helping the victims were Ranger (Bob Campbell) and Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz) trying to ensure that they could balance the bridge to prevent cars from falling over the edge. They managed to solve the problem paving the way for things to go back to normal. The affected people express their thanks and admiration to them.

As they fly away together, Bob and Jimmy talk about matters related to being ultra heroes. A short time later, Jimmy takes the train going to New Jersey as a civilian. He arrives at the facility of Direct Contact which is a division of NuWare. It turns out this is his first day of work with them and he is still struggling with the drastic changes now that his huge perks and privileges with UltraTech are no more…  

Quality

Jimmy Ruiz in a tough situation in front with his new boss on his first day at work.

I really like the story and the way Jimmy Ruiz was portrayed. This is really fine writing by Len Strazewski and it seems he organized a plan to not only redefine the protagonist but also change the status quo around him. I liked the way Strazewski set up the first-day-on-the-job struggles of Jimmy which really showed how fragile he is as a person without the armored suit to help him. His boss really was hard on him and made things a bit complicated for him as far as the use of Prototype is concerned under the control of NuWare. I also like the way Jimmy was portrayed in trying to be very responsible about his domestic life and the future ahead of him and his pregnant darling Angella.

Apart from the in-depth characterization, there is a good amount of superhero action to keep fans satisfied. The action was nicely drawn by Dean Zachary.

Conclusion

Prototype and Ranger.

Prototype #15 (1994) is a lot of fun and pretty engaging. In fact, this comic book is a nice pay-off following the build-up that was done in issue #14. To see Jimmy Ruiz redefined as a person without the armor is compelling and the story was nicely structured by Len Strazewski. For serious Prototype fans, this is one comic book that is worth reading again and again. Lastly, this one has a very intriguing ending that you have to read and find out.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Prototype #15 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, Prototype #15 (1994) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at The Solution #13 (1994)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

If you’ve got a problem that needs solving, you call The Solution. That’s how it is in the Ultraverse with regards to hiring some specialists (and wild at that) for help. For the newcomers reading this, The Solution is a heroes-for-hire group led by Lela Cho/Tech (note: read about her origin story) with three unique teammates.

In recent times, I’ve been reviewing Ultraverse comic books of The Night Man and Solitaire which formed the first two parts of the Hostile Takeover crossover storyline. From this point on we can see the 3rd chapter in this look back at The Solution #13, published by Malibu Comics in 1994 written by the late James Hudnall and drawn by Scott Benefiel.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with a look back at the private communication between J.D. Hunt and Rex Mundi (as seen in The Night Man #12). After their talk, J.D. Hunt hires The Solution to find out what is going on at the headquarters of UltraTech in New York.

Later under the busy streets of Manhattan, the team make their way through the darkness with Aera using her magic to find the building. When asked by Troy why they took the mission considering J.D. Hunt’s reputation as a “sleaze on wheels”, Lela Cho states that she is certain that he only wants them to find information that could be used against UltraTech. She added that she does not believe Hunt.

As they talk, Night Man quietly listens to them staying still. Just after Aera found the way for the team to enter the basement of UltraTech’s building, Night Man follows them. Elsewhere, Gordon Bell becomes aware of the intrusion which Prototype (Jimmy Ruiz) and Ranger (Bob Campbell) witness. Bell tells Bob to go to the basement and tells Jimmy to go to the roof…

Quality

The Solution with Night Man and Ranger.

I will start with the visual presentation. This comic book has the unusual yet engaging approach of using pairs of pages to form these wide-angle images composed of a dominating view with panels of other images filling the remaining space. It can be jarring at first but once you get the hang of the story, these visuals will flow smoothly at a nice pace. It should be noted that artist Scott Benefiel is pretty good in visualizing Night Man, Prototype and other related Ultraverse characters. He also did a good job with images of action and superhero spectacle.

As far as storytelling goes, this 3rd chapter of the Hostile Takeover crossover storyline is the most interesting and the most enjoyable to read yet. While The Night Man #12 worked as a big build-up and Solitaire #10 worked as a mere side-story, there is a good payoff in this comic book and at the same time it moved the storyline forward to the next stage.

James Hudnall also kept the details tight and the way he wrote the interactions as the established Ultraverse characters got mixed up is simply great. I really enjoyed reading Lela Cho/Tech talking with Bob Campbell/Ranger about his getting screwed by the corporation, and Night Man’s interactions with The Solution’s members were nicely done.  

Conclusion

The stage is set for conflict.

The Solution #13 (1994) is very enjoyable and compelling! It is the complete package of solid storytelling, memorable character interactions and spectacle that also adds depth to the narrative of the Hostile Takeover storyline. Superhero stuff aside, the element of corporate intrigue remains present which also serves as a lively reminder about what this crossover storyline is about.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of The Solution #13 (1994), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the comic book costs $14.

Overall, The Solution #13 (1994) is recommended.

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com