A Look Back at Wonder Woman #23 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Before I start another retro review of the post-Crisis Wonder Woman comic book series, I need to share to you readers my observations about the recent social media trends that happened inside three Wonder Woman-focused groups within Facebook.

For one thing, I asked a simple question on all three WW FB groups asking the members if they would want to see Zack Snyder replace Patty Jenkins as the director of future Wonder Woman movies. Their reactions were pretty mixed and among them were a few very toxic responses. One group member asked me why do I hate Patty Jenkins (I have no hatred for her and in fact I admired her work in the 2017 Wonder Woman movie and pointed out her work in my piece about the No Man’s Land scene). Another member (an openly feminist-minded male) condemned me of sexism (completely false).

And in most recent times, I posted a few not so favorable media reviews of Zack Snyder’s Justice League on those same three WW groups on Facebook. This member called me a hater (I’m not a hater and I cannot judge a movie I have not even viewed), another member thought I allowed the negative review to influence me (sharing a post of an unfavorable review does NOT mean I believe in it), while another member took it very personal against me by means of verbal attacks (that person does not even know me and he allowed his uncontrolled fanaticism to go on the offense) on me.

Whew! There sure are a lot of Wonder Woman fans out there who are over-sensitive, who lacked self-control, who allowed themselves to be influenced by the socialists, and who allowed themselves to be swallowed by unrestrained political correctness. Clearly there are lots of hostile minds and likely believers of Cancel Culture among fellow WW fans which is unfortunate. What I posted on those FB groups were simply about entertainment, not identity politics and certainly not about attacking others.

I am still standing here!

Anyway, last time I reviewed an issue of Wonder Woman that I determined lacked depth and only served to build-up suspense and anticipation for future events. What will happen next to Wonder Woman and her companions? Will there be a pay-off to the build-up that happened in the pages of issue #22? We can all find out in this look back at Wonder Woman #23, published by DC Comics in 1988 with a story written and drawn by George Perez with finishes done by Will Blybers.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with a print media blast of Diana, her mother Queen Hippolyte, as well as Julie Kapatelis and her daughter Vanessa all occupying varied parts of the front cover of The World Today magazine with a feature about the royal family of Themyscira. At the corner of the cover says, “Memories of a Boston teen.”

At school, the teenage Vanessa (referred to as Nessie) is completely surrounded by other students who want her to sign their respective copies of the said magazine. She is enjoying the attention being the close, personal friend of the Amazons. Vanessa’s friends Eileen and Meekins can only watch the activity from a distance feeling lonely and let down.

In New York, Wonder Woman delivered a speech to the United Nations general assembly. She spoke on behalf of her mother and formally announced that the gates of Themyscira will be opened to the rest of the world (which is the result of the Amazons’ majority vote in issue #22). The response to her speech ranged from enthusiastic to apathetic.

After the speech, Diana finds herself surrounded by news reporters who ask her a lot of questions about her homeland, Queen Hippolyta’s potential visit to man’s world (AKA patriarch’s world) and the way some assembly members reacted to her speech.

Suddenly a mysterious figure whose head and face cannot be seen emerges. Diana senses something is wrong…

Quality

Wonder Woman flying in search of the mysterious figure.

I will start first by confirming that indeed, this comic book’s story has some pay-off to the suspense built-up in issue #22. Take note…some pay-off. It might sound disappointing for those who read issue #22 expecting a big pay-off but after going through the theme of this particular story, it is clear that there were planned plot events lying ahead related to the build-up (in issue #22).

More on the story itself, without spoiling much, I can say that George Perez pushed the envelope yet again by involving Hermes a lot more with Wonder Woman here. A lord to Diana, Hermes appeared not merely for a cameo appearance nor as a guide as seen in the early issues of this series, but rather he has a much bigger role than before. Hermes does not just appear with Wonder Woman who strictly follows him, he also makes an impact with the people on Earth.

When it comes to moral lessons, this comic book is boldly written by touching on themes such as how a deity from Olympus would impact people by bribing them, why mortals let their guard down when they believe what they saw or witnessed, and why would a foreign deity (from Olympus specifically) does not want mortals to challenge their authority.

The good news here is that everything is very well written from the way the plot was structured, the clear presence of emotion that filled much of the dialogue and the notable presence of philosophies that added depth to the dialogue.

When it comes to Wonder Woman herself, I love the way how Perez portrayed her on her struggle of doing her duty (for Themyscira and her deities) and maintaining friendship with the people she loved in man’s world. There is that nice touch of fragility on Diana’s personality and the same can be found on Julie Kapatelis whose struggle with being a mother and a friend is nicely dramatized.

Conclusion

Wonder Woman faces the world through the corrupt United Nations.

I can say that Wonder Woman #23 (1998) is a clear improvement over its predecessor by means of having a solid story concept backed with nice artwork (no surprise) and in-depth writing done by George Perez. I also like the fact that Wonder Woman herself gets upstaged in a rather reasonable way which shows Perez was not afraid to take risks when it comes to redefining the Queen of Superheroes in the post-Crisis era of DC Comics. Lastly, this comic book shows how faith is not to be practiced and why deities of Olympus are not worthy of faith and trust of the people. It also shows idolatry is foolishness.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #23 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $35 while the near-mint copy of the 2nd print edition costs $350.

Overall, Wonder Woman #23 (1998) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #21 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of superhero universe of DC Comics! I don’t know with you, my readers, but I love the way George Perez and his fellow writers characterized Wonder Woman during the very early stage of the post-Crisis era of DC Comics. The character development was not only a great way to achieve balance with spectacle and plotting for each story of Wonder Woman, but also a solid way to redefine the Queen of Superheroes to new fans as well as other comic book readers of the late 1980s. Such characterization efforts include redefining other key elements of the Wonder Woman concept such as the development of Themyscira and its all-women society, the struggle that the deities of Olympus had while the Amazons struggled, and most notably the way Wonder Woman and the people of man’s world adjusted to each other.

With those details laid down, we can find out more about Wonder Woman’s development in this look back at Wonder Woman #21, published by DC Comics in 1988 with a story written and drawn by George Perez with Bob McLeod credited with the finished art.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins in Themyscira. In the middle of the night, Menalippe, the oracle of the Amzons wakes up looking terrified. She makes a reference to the deities of Olympus. In Wakefield, Massachusetts, Diana/Wonder Woman, Julia Kapatelis and teenager Vanessa arrive home from the memorial service of the late Myndi Mayer. As Vanessa goes to her bedroom feeling depressed, Diana admits to Julia that she is deeply troubled over what happened in recent times. She also expressed that she can’t help feeling partially responsible for Mayer’s death.

As Julia tries to comfort Diana, several knocks were made at the house door. Upon opening it, a bird carrying a note suddenly flies into the house and heads straight to Diana who recognizes it and reads a new message written by her mother, the queen Hippolyte.

After reading it, Diana leaves for Themyscira with a promise to Julia and her daughter that she will return. Shortly after arriving in her nation, she, her mother and all their Amazon sisters assembled at the altar of Apollo and performed a ritual led by Menalippe. Menalippe claims to have made contact with the deities and states that she, Diana and Queen Hippolyte have been called to appear at the court in Mount Olympus…

Quality

The deities of Olympus were never holy and were in fact very flawed beings who happen to hold tremendous power over Wonder Woman and the Amazons.

I can say that this is a story about the foundation of Wonder Woman’s place in the DC Comic universe as it involves the link between Olympus and Themyscira. The good news here is that this story is very well written and the plot structure was nicely organized by George Perez.

In many ways, this story is a continuation to Wonder Woman’s personal interaction with the deities of Olympus. The difference here is that her mother Queen Hippolyte and their oracle are much more involved and the deities – which include Zeus, Hera, Heracles and the rest – themselves have gotten into tremendous trouble as a result of what Darkseid did to them. This leads to the call of a new order which got the three Amazons chosen. This alone marks the new chapter in the lives of Amazons and Wonder Woman, who proved her worth in the Challenge of the Gods storyline, is unsurprisingly part of it.

When it comes to the character development of Wonder Woman, the golden part happened early in this comic book. I love the way that George Perez portrayed Diana to be fragile as a person who realizes that her being a very powerful icon in man’s world causes both blessings and problems around her. Diana admits getting blinded by the celebrity of being Wonder Woman to the many people around her. The dialogue Perez wrote for Diana in the early scene (in the presence of Julia) is very rich and so touching, you will feel sympathy for the Queen of all Superheroes.

Conclusion

A very touching scene about Diana/Wonder Woman dealing with the responsibility of what went wrong recently.

Apart from being a new chapter for Wonder Woman and her Amazons, Wonder Woman #21 (1988) is a richly layered story to read. It does not have the usual good-versus-evil spectacle common with most superhero comic books, but the story succeeds in moving the narrative of the Amazons and Olympus deities forward while developing Diana as an even more human character (as opposed to being a superhero). This is another great work spearheaded by George Perez.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #21 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $33 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition and the 2nd print edition cost $70 each.

Overall, Wonder Woman #21 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #17 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

When was the last time you traveled overseas not to have fun the usual way (partying, spending time in bars, watching movies or stage plays, and the like) but rather to immerse yourself into history by visiting several historical sites? When you plan to travel overseas, have you thought about pursuing the wonder of discovery?

Welcome back, Wonder Woman fans and comic collectors! It has been almost a year since I started publishing retro reviews of Wonder Woman comic books from the post-Crisis age of DC Comics drawn by the famous George Perez. I can say that I really enjoyed the modernizing of the Queen of Superheroes done by Perez along with the late Len Wein. In fact, my enjoyment on the post-Crisis Wonder Woman is greater than what I had for the New 52 Wonder Woman. For those who love Wonder Woman movies, check out my retro review of the 2017 Wonder Woman movie and my feature about the No Man’s Land scene. If you are into the latest movie Wonder Woman 1984 starring Gal GadotChris Pine and Kristen Wiig, be aware that the 4K Blu-ray combo of it will be released on March 30, 2021. I already ordered a copy of it.

Going back to what I mentioned earlier, discovering new places can be tremendous experiences for those who travel abroad. With those details laid down, we can finally start this look back at Wonder Woman #17, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story written and drawn by George Perez with ink work done by Dick Giordano.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins as a white bird flies high in the sky in the middle of dark clouds and bolts of lightning. The bird is carrying a message and as it continues to move forward, the darkness fades away as light and calm clouds set in.

In Wakefield, Massachusetts, Diana Prince/Wonder Woman receives her special United Nations (UN) passport from Etta Candy. It turns out that Julie Kapatelis is in Athens, Greece, making arrangements for Diana’s first overseas trip in man’s world. As they talk, Etta reveals that Steve Trevor is aware of the connection between Wonder Woman’s costume with his mother.

As Vanessa (Julie’s daughter) comes down from the second floor, Steve Trevor enters the house carrying a bird carrying a message. Even as she recognizes the bird, she is amazed to discover that it arrived there all the way from Themyscira. The message carried by the bird is from Diana’s mother, Queen Hippolyte. She begins to read the message in the car with Vanessa on the way to the airport…

Quality

Diana visits and discovers Greece.

I’ll start by pointing out that this is the first issue of this particular monthly series to be written entirely by George Perez (note: Len Wein was involved with the script for issue #16) and, as I read this comic book, he wrote well and succeeded in further developing Wonder Woman’s personality just as she discovers more of man’s world and its connections with her fellow Amazons.

In this comic book, Wonder Woman (with Vanessa) travels to Greece for an arranged visit with her mentor Julie anticipating her arrival. Upon arriving in Greece, a lot of people warmly welcomed Wonder Woman who in turn got reunited with Julie in the presence of her Greek friend Stavros. In relation to the opening paragraph of this review, this is the story of Diana’s discovery of Greece, its people, its culture and legacy. The way Perez wrote and visualized her discovering and learning of the Greek sites really emphasized her thoughts as her perception of man’s world and its connections to her people and her culture builds up.

Unlike the previous two issues, this story is much heavier with character development and Perez’s writing is indeed engaging. As you read Diana’s words and thoughts, you will experience intrigue and even relate to her experiencing a great wonder of discovery. Also worth reading are her thoughts about Superman.

Apart from the focus on Wonder Woman, this comic book also paid attention to the intrigue that happened among the deities of Olympus – including Heracles – who are still recovering from the great disturbance caused by Darkseid. Oh yes, the story also marked the start of the build-up of another supervillain for Diana to face.

Conclusion

In the airplane on the way to Greece.

While it clearly lacked a strong conflict between good and evil, the wonder of discovery as well as the in-depth characterization made Wonder Woman #17 (1988) a must-read. George Perez, who is best known for his artworks, proved to be a very solid writer and it should be noted that he went on to write a whole lot more stories about the Queen of Superheroes.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #17 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $42 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $42.

Overall, Wonder Woman #17 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #14 (1988)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Welcome back, superhero enthusiasts, comic book collectors and fans of DC Comics! By this time, the road for Wonder Woman 1984’s run in the movie theaters around the world is ending. That being said, the next way for people to avail of the said movie is the anticipated 4K Blu-ray release of it. That is something I am looking forward to and I am not fond of video-on-demand streaming when it comes to big movie productions (which are best enjoyed in the movie theater). Recently, I’ve heard buzz the Wonder Woman 1984 will be released on 4K Blu-ray and Blu-ray formats within the first-half of 2021, and there is also buzz those will be released this coming April. Again, there is still no official launch date yet for Wonder Woman 1984 in optical disc format but once the announcement has been made, I’ll update you all.

Now we can focus on the post-crisis Wonder Woman comic books of the late 1980s. Last time around, the Challenge of the Gods story saw Diana/Wonder Woman and her mother Queen Hippolyte together as well as the deformed, petrified presence of a certain demi-god who abused the queen very long ago.

Want to find out what will happen next? We can see what follows in this look back at Wonder Woman #14, published in 1988 by DC Comics with a story by George Perez and Len Wein. Perez drew the comic book with ink work done by Bruce D. Patterson.

The cover.

Early story

The story begins with Wonder Woman rushing back to into the deep darkness. While flying through the air, she recalls the details about the death of Pan (the son of Hermes) as well as the manhunter who murdered and then impersonated him causing his own destruction. While justice has been served, she wonders why must so many battles end with senseless slaughter.

Suddenly, to her shock, she sees her mother Queen Hippolyta laying down on the rubble helpless as Heracles (the son of Zeus) struggles with carrying the entire weight of paradise island upon his shoulders. Heracles tells Wonder Woman to begone, stating that there is no place for such as her.

Realizing that Wonder Woman is Hippolyta’s daughter, Heracles tells Diana to take her mother away quickly. Wonder Woman carries her mother and flies off heading towards the surface where their fellow Amazons are waiting…

Quality

Steve Trevor and Etta Candy.

I’ll start first by confirming that this story is a very strong conclusion to the Challenge of the Gods storyline (started in issue #10 followed in issues #11, #12 and #13) complete with clear impact on the Amazons (both emotionally and socially) as well as on the deities of Olympus. Clearly, George Perez and Len Wein organized themselves and prepared the storyline’s structuring, concept and post-event direction early.

As expected, the fantasy and mythological elements are very well portrayed giving the comic book’s story a richly layered structure and solid quality. There is a lot of dramatic stuff here as the tale involving Wonder Woman, her fellow Amazons and the deities of Olympus who all got affected by the conclusion of the storyline. With regards to the presence of Heracles, I do recommend re-reading Wonder Woman #1 (1987) so that you will not only understand the background details but also feel the overall impact of his role in this story. More on the storytelling, there are themes about forgiveness, justification, fulfillment and diplomacy.

Apart from Wonder Woman, the Amazons and the deities, there is a very intriguing sub-plot about Steve Trevor who, at this point of the post-Crisis DC universe, is not Diana’s love interest but rather a supporting character whose heritage is somewhat linked with the Amazons.

Conclusion

This is a magnificent looking art at the start of the story.

Wonder Woman #14 (1988) is truly a great comic book to read! Not only is this a pretty powerful conclusion to the Challenge of the Gods storyline, it succeeded in defining Wonder Woman not only as brave and strong, but also dutiful, focused and compassionate. I should state that the events in this comic book really marked another notable turning point in the overall narrative of the post-Crisis Wonder Woman monthly series.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #14 (1988), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $30 while the near-mint copy of the newsstand edition costs $60.

Overall, Wonder Woman #14 (1988) is highly recommended!

+++++

Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com

A Look Back at Wonder Woman #1 (1987)

Disclaimer: This is my original work with details sourced from reading the comic book and doing personal research. Anyone who wants to use this article, in part or in whole, needs to secure first my permission and agree to cite me as the source and author. Let it be known that any unauthorized use of this article will constrain the author to pursue the remedies under R.A. No. 8293, the Revised Penal Code, and/or all applicable legal actions under the laws of the Philippines.

Hey Wonder Woman and superhero fans! By now, many of you are aware that I wrote and published several retro comic book reviews about the Post-Crisis Wonder Woman specifically the comic books that involved the legendary George Perez, Greg Potter and the late Len Wein. For today, I’ll be reviewing Wonder Woman #1 (1987), the landmark comic book that marked the start of what was back then the new age of greatness of Wonder Woman, the Queen of all Superheroes!

Before starting my review, let’s take a short look back at the publishing history with the online research I did.

In the mid-1980s, DC Comics published the maxi-series Crisis on Infinite Earths to not only celebrate their 50th anniversary but also to conclude what was the original multi-verse (multiple universes) of the publisher. Written by Marv Wolfman and drawn by George Perez, Crisis on Infinte Earths became critically acclaimed and a major seller as the saga saw the deaths of hundreds of characters, destruction of worlds and ultimately paved the way for DC Comics to reboot their superhero universe entirely.

And then the post-Crisis era of DC Comics happened. After Superman and Batman were successfully reintroduced, the Queen of all Superheroes herself – Wonder Woman – was up for a relaunch.

Behind the scenes at DC Comics, brainstorming for rebooting Wonder Woman took place initially with editor Janice Race and writer Greg Potter. The ideas of presenting the Amazons as reincarnated beings of women who previously died and having the story set in the City of Boston came from Potter.

Eventually George Perez got involved. The famed illustrator perceived Wonder Woman as more of a fantasy character.

“That was the background of the Wonder Woman character, which I felt was also the thing that made her unique as a character, and I thought that it had been downplayed in order to make her more of a standard superhero,” Perez stated.

Perez and Potter were co-writers. Perez himself conducted research on mythology which served as the foundation of the fantasy element of the planed post-Crisis Wonder Woman monthly series. This involved portrayals of deities of Olympus whose acts affect the Amazons living in the flesh. Apart from the fantasy and mythology, Perez implemented some key elements (specifically involving feminism and humanism) thanks to his discussion with Wonder Woman editor Karen Berger.

“A lot of research went into this first issue, and my bookshelves are full of reference material on mythology, Greek hairstyles, armor, clothing and even attitudes of the time. Some compromises were made where different references contradicted each other, but no decision was made without thought. We all have fallen in love with this project and want everyone to share in our excitement,” Perez wrote in the introduction in Wonder Woman #1 (1987).

Now that the history lesson is over, we can now all take a look back at Wonder Woman #1, published in 1987 by DC Comics with a story co-written by Greg Potter and George Perez. The art was done by Perez supported by the ink work of Bruce Patterson.

Cover
A very magnificent looking cover by George Perez.

Early story

The story begins in the distant past of 30,000 B.C. Inside a cave, a man hits a pregnant woman’s head with his club instantly killing her and the unborn child.

In 1,200 B.C. at Mount Olympus, the god of war Ares tells his father Zeus (with the presence of other deities watching) that if Olympus truly desires to own the hearts of men and gain power, they should let him descend upon mortals. Ares views the mortals as weak and stressed that he could crush them all into eternal submission.

But Artemis (Ares’ half-sister), whose plan to create a new race of mortals on Earth was vehemently opposed by the god of war, responded by stressing that violence will make men fear them and not follow them. She stressed that the intention behind the plan was to set an example by showing man and woman’s true place with each other. The new race of mortals was planned to be female. Zeus, who is aware of the plan, leaves and tells the others to settle the plan among themselves. For his part, Ares leaves Olympus laughing.

With the many souls stuck in limbo for generations available to them, the deities Aphrodite, Artemis, Athena, Hestia and Demeter create the Amazons who appeared with adult bodies. The first to come out among them all was Hippolyte, the mother of Diana/Wonder Woman. In the presence of the many Amazons, Hippolyte was declared queen by the deities…

Quality

27
Diana was the only child to grow up with the Amazons.

When it comes to quality of storytelling, art, characterization and spectacle, Wonder Woman #1 is unquestionably an excellent comic book even by today’s standards! For the story, Greg Potter and George Perez crafted an epic fantasy tale retelling the origin of not only Wonder Woman but also of the Amazons complete with a very inspired portrayal of the deities of Olympus who actions and decisions affect the mortals. I should mention here that the portrayal of the mother-and-daughter relationship between Queen Hippolyte and Princess Diana really was compelling to see. Not only that, there were also elements of gender conflict, intrigue and worship portrayed.

It is clear that Perez really studied mythology and Greek culture to create a story that is still believable when it comes to emphasizing Wonder Woman for what was back then the modern readers of 1987 from the superhero geeks to long-time Wonder Woman fans and to girls and women in general. More than that, this story is timeless and clearly it is an illustrated literature classic on its own right.

24
This is how the Amazons built their society in Themyscira.

The comic book has over thirty pages of story and art, with the pace ranging from medium to fast. As such, it managed to completely tell the stories of the Amazons and Princess Diana in just one comic book. By the time I finished this comic book, I got enlightened about the background of the Amazons and Wonder Woman herself.

When it comes to the art, each and every page of Wonder Woman #1 is very beautifully drawn by George Perez. His research on Greek culture and mythology is nicely reflected in his drawings. Just look at how he visualizes Olympus, the armor worn by soldiers, the clothes, the hairstyles, the coliseum, the architecture and more complete with a good amount of details visualized. The final page Perez drew remains very stunning, inspiring and heroic!

Conclusion

5
The deities of Olympus.

There is no doubt in my mind that Wonder Woman #1 of 1987 is truly one of the greatest superhero comic books ever published. The creative team succeeded in not only reintroducing Wonder Woman, her people and their part in the post-Crisis DC Comics universe, they also succeeded in modernizing them as well as dramatizing their origins altogether within the 32 pages of this comic book.

While it is a fact that a lot of people nowadays are highly familiar with the cinematic Wonder Woman (memorably played by Gal Gadot), for me the post-Crisis version of the Queen of Superheroes remains the definitive version and I can only wish that director Patty Jenkins would adapt more elements from this. It should be noted that this particular rebooted Wonder Woman is believable and can be taken more seriously among all superheroes.

If you are seriously planning to buy an existing hard copy of Wonder Woman #1 (1987), be aware that as of this writing, MileHighComics.com shows that the near-mint copy of the regular edition costs $51. The near-mint copies of the newsstand edition and the edition without a month printed cost$102 and $153 respectively.

Overall, Wonder Woman #1 (1987) is highly recommended! 


Thank you for reading. If you find this article engaging, please click the like button below and also please consider sharing this article to others. If you are looking for a copywriter to create content for your special project or business, check out my services and my portfolio. Feel free to contact me as well. Also please feel free to visit my Facebook page Author Carlo Carrasco and follow me at HavenorFantasy@twitter.com